'Town hall' meeting set to talk cycling solutions - The Coloradoan

Google News | Cycling - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 13:33

The Coloradoan

'Town hall' meeting set to talk cycling solutions
The Coloradoan
In the wake of recent crashes that killed two avid cyclists, Fort Collins groups have scheduled a “town hall meeting” in pursuit of solutions and accountability. The meeting will be held 6:30 p.m. Aug. 6 at Rio Grande Mexican Restaurant, 143 W ...

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Categories: News

With the rigors of two tough grand tours in his legs, Contador ends his season

VeloNews - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 13:05

After climbing the mountains of both the Giro and the Tour this year, Alberto Contador has decided to call it a season. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

No one can accuse Alberto Contador (Tinkoff-Saxo) for a lack of trying.

Spain’s “pistolero” fell short of the elusive Giro d’Italia-Tour de France double, finishing fifth despite stubbornly fighting all the way to Paris.

Worn down by the demands of back-to-back grand tours, Contador pulled the plug on his 2015 season this week. Citing a fever, he will not race this weekend’s Clásica San Sebastián, putting a anti-climatic end to his historic double attempt.

“Alberto still has high fever, and is unable to race,” said Tinkoff-Saxo sport director Patxi Vila in a team release. “He also renounces the criteriums he has scheduled to attend, and, as a result, his 2015 racing season has come to an end.”

That kind of season finale is hardly what Contador was hoping for. Even when he was a pedal stroke or two behind eventual Tour winner Chris Froome (Sky) after leaving the Pyrénées, Contador was still quietly hoping to finish on the final podium in Paris.

Though he publicly kept up appearances, saying he thought overall victory was still possible, the podium became the realistic goal as the Tour turned into the Alps. It was Contador and Tinkoff-Saxo Michael Rogers who upped the pace in stage 17 to shed third-place Tejay van Garderen (BMC Racing), forcing the American’s exit from the Tour. A heavy crash that same day on the treacherous descent off the Cat. 1 Col d’Allos, however, hurt more than the team let anyone know.

“We still believed Alberto could win a stage and even reach the podium, but he was really injured badly in that crash,” Tinkoff-Saxo sport director Steven de Jongh told VeloNews. “Alberto is very tough, but he was really hurting after that.”

Worn out, battered, and even a touch sick, Contador rolled into Paris with no regrets. He knew his Giro-Tour bid would be difficult, but Contador didn’t want to end his career without at least attempting the historic double.

“I would have always regretted if I hadn’t tried [the double],” Contador said. “The Giro was harder than I had hoped it would have been. Astana made it very hard for me, and with the hard efforts in the final week, and in the mountains, I came out of the Giro tired. I was fresh mentally, very motivated, but my body was still tired.”

Contador’s Giro victory clearly came at a high cost. Sky principal Dave Brailsford said he watched the Italian grand tour in interest as Contador battled against Astana’s Fabio Aru and Mikel Landa to secure the pink jersey.

“There were a few days where Contador had to go really deep,” Brailsford told VeloNews. “Those efforts cost everyone. The Giro was very hard this year. All of our guys came out of the race very tired as well.”

It will be interesting to see what the other main GC contenders take out of Contador’s double effort. Some suggest the demands of modern cycling are too great to realistically try to win the Giro and Tour in succession. Contador won both the Giro and Vuelta in 2008, but no one’s won two consecutive grand tours in the same season since Marco Pantani won the Giro and Tour in 1998.

When asked about whether or not he’d tackle the Giro-Tour double someday, Froome said winning both grand tours back to back is a “big ask.”

“It’s a huge challenge, a huge goal to set for yourself. I think [Contador] was feeling the effects of that effort at the Giro,” Froome said. “I wouldn’t say it is impossible. It is a very tough challenge.”

While the likes of Froome, Vincenzo Nibali (Astana), and Nairo Quintana (Movistar) consider a possible start in next month’s Vuelta a España, Contador is steering clear of a Vuelta defense.

Contador has started four grand tours in a row, finishing three. After crashing out of the 2014 Tour, he won both the 2014 Vuelta and the 2015 Giro. After taking fifth in the 2015 Tour, the 32-year-old said it’s time for a vacation.

“We knew it would be difficult, but Alberto was determined to do it. I admire him because he was brave to try,” De Jongh said. “Next year, we will have a different plan, to come into the Tour fresher. We will discuss these things in the next months.”

Speaking to reporters on the finish line in Paris, Contador said the 2016 season was already on his mind. He confirmed one double attempt is enough.

“Next year, we’ll change everything, and focus completely on the Tour,” he said. “I want to make a season like I did [in 2014], with the first part of the season at full strength, race the Tour, and perhaps even the Olympic Games, which I hear is a hard route, and might be suited for me.”

Contador even hinted he could retire following the Rio de Janeiro Games next summer. Though he was unable to match the feat of such riders as Miguel Indurain or Bernard Hinault in winning the Giro and Tour in the same season this year, at least he tried. Whether anyone else takes up the challenge in the next few years seems unlikely.

The post With the rigors of two tough grand tours in his legs, Contador ends his season appeared first on VeloNews.com.

Categories: News

Do you think our earnings reports from bike companies are valuable?

Bicycle Retailer & Industry News - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 12:43
Choices Yes, I read the articles most of the time Yes, I value the news, but I usually just read the headlines on the homepage No, I don't pay much attention to them Yes, I read the articles most of the time 50% (67 votes) Yes, I value the news, but I usually just read the headlines on the homepage 19% (25 votes) No, I don't pay much attention to them 32% (43 votes) Total votes: 135 if (typeof PollAnon == 'undefined') { var PollAnon = {}; } PollAnon.nid = 21643;
Categories: News

Tour of Utah announces preliminary start list: Danielson, Rivera back to defend titles

VeloNews - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 12:37

Tom Danielson will look to score a third consecutive Tour of Utah victory next week, but Chris Horner will make the start as well hoping to climb onto the top step of the overall podium after two straight second-place finishes. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

The Tour of Utah has announced the provisional start lists for its men’s and women’s races, and both reigning champions will return to defend their titles — though they’ll face plenty of opposition.

2013 and 2014 Larry H. Miller Tour of Utah champion Tom Danielson (Cannondale-Garmin) will pursue a record third consecutive overall victory in the men’s race, which runs from August 3 to August 9. Joe Dombrowski, who was named the Best Young Rider and finished fourth overall at the 2012 Tour of Utah, will also make the start for Cannondale-Garmin.

“The Tour of Utah is one of the toughest races in the world. I am super proud to be two-time defending champion of this race,” said Danielson. “The state of Utah and the race are one of a kind and I look forward to coming back with my teammates to defend my title.”

Chris Horner, riding this year for Airgas Safeway Cycling, will be among those hoping to challenge Danielson’s recent dominance. The 43-year-old has been runner-up to Danielson two years in a row, and won a stage during his 2013 campaign.

Cannondale-Garmin is not the only WorldTour team making the start at the America Tour race, recently awarded an upgraded 2.HC rating. U.S. national champion Matthew Busche — Tour of Utah runner-up in 2012 — and Luxembourg’s Fränk Schleck will headline the Trek Factory Racing squad. Joey Rosskopf, winner of the mountains classification in 2014, and Michael Schär, stage winner last year, are set to represent BMC Racing.

South African Pro Continental team MTN-Qhubeka, which recently debuted in the Tour de France, will make its Tour of Utah debut this year led in the hunt for sprint victories by Matthew Goss, while Wouter Wippert of Australian Pro Continental team Drapac and 2014 points classification winner Jure Kocjan (SmartStop) will hope to oppose him in the bunch finishes. Janez Brajkovic will bid for the general classification from American Pro Continental squad UnitedHealthcare. 2013 Giro d’Italia king of the mountains Stefano Pirazzi and his Bardiani-CSF teammates Manuel Francesco Bongiorno and Edoardo Zardini will look for success on the climbs as well.

22-year-old American Coryn Rivera (UnitedHealthcare) will look to defend her title in the Tour of Utah Women’s Edition: Criterium Classic, which runs August 2 to August 3. She is currently ranked fifth in the individual standing of the USA Cycling National Criterium Calendar (NCC).

The rest of the current NCC top 10 will compete as well, among them points leader Erica Allar (LA Sweat) and U.S. criterium champion Kendall Ryan (Team TIBCO-SVB).

The starters in both the men’s and women’s races will be presented at the official team presentation August 1.

The post Tour of Utah announces preliminary start list: Danielson, Rivera back to defend titles appeared first on VeloNews.com.

Categories: News

Win a MTN-Qhubeka Team Replica Bike with ENVE Wheels and Components!

Fat Cyclist - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 11:49

A Note from Fatty: If you can see where I’m headed just by looking at the pictures below, feel free to go to this page to donate without further ado.

Guys, I have something I want to show you. This:

NewImage

Honestly, I just don’t have many words that can do justice to this bike, so let me instead show you another picture:

NewImage

This is the Cervelo S5 Aero Road Bike, Team MTN-Qhubeka edition, completely outfitted with ENVE wheels and components

S5 TdF final MTN Qhubeka by Jens Herrndorff photography  3 von 12

And it is beautiful. Like, unbelievably beautiful.

S5 TdF final MTN Qhubeka by Jens Herrndorff photography  5 von 12

And my friends at ENVE Composites — a proud sponsor of Team MTN-Qhubeka, are donating one of these incredible bikes as a grand prize in the Grand Slam for Kenya

Equipped with ENVE wheels, ROTOR rings, cranks and power meters, KMC chains, Shimano Dura-ace Di2 drivetrain and brakes, Ceramic Speed bearings and a Sella Italia saddles, this is, without question, the most exclusive, amazing bike I have ever had in a contest. 

It is just like the bikes the pros in Team MTN-Qhubeka rode, with the exception that ENVE will also provide the cockpit for the bike.

In other words, the bike we’re giving away as part of the Grand Slam for Kenya will be nicer than the ones the pros rode.

How does that make you feel? A little bit like this? 

NewImage

Friends and Family

It  makes perfect sense to have this bike as a prize in Grand Slam for Kenya. After all, Qhubeka is World Bicycle Relief’s program in South Africa that provides bicycles to people in need.

Check out the Thompsons — WBR Ambassadors and Friends of Fatty — riding with Team Principal Doug Ryder, Polka-Dot Jersey phenom Daniel Teklehaimanot, and team honcho Tyler Farrar:

NewImage

It’s been an amazing month, both for the Tour de France and for World Bicycle Relief. 

NewImage

I don’t think there’s ever been a question of whether the cause is good enough to warrant donating in the Grand Slam for Kenya.

But if there’s ever been a question of whether the prizes in the Grand Slam for Kenya warrant making a donation…well, I think that question has now been definitively answered. 

Click here to donate. And good luck!

PS: On a personal note, I want to express huge thanks to ENVE for providing this bike. Honestly, I’m overwhelmed.

Categories: Culture

Shimano sales up 26% in first half

Bicycle Retailer & Industry News - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 11:16
Bike-related sales were up nearly 30 percent.

OSAKA, Japan (BRAIN) — Shimano Inc. sales were up nearly 26 percent in the first half this year, to 197 billion yen ($1.6 billion) worldwide.

Net earnings were up 76 percent, to 37 billion yen, according to the company's unaudited first-half financial report, released this week.

Bicycle-related sales accounted for 80 percent of the company's business in the first half, followed by fishing (19 percent) and other business (0.1 percent). Bike sales were the strongest of the three divisions, recording a net sales increase of 29.7 percent, while fishing was up 9.8 percent and other business was down 5.2 percent.

The company said a solid economy in the U.S. contributed to the results, as did the continued depreciation of the yen, which makes Japanese-made goods relatively affordable. Shimano had recorded a 30 percent sales increase in the first quarter this year.

"Europe and North America experienced virtually no decline in demand despite somewhat unsettled weather during the first half," the company said. "Reflecting growing interest in the use of bicycles in society, retail sales in the first half were brisk. As a result, distributor inventories in Europe remained virtually at the appropriate level and those in the U.S. were slightly lower than the appropriate level."

The company noted that in Japan, sales of sports bicycles remained robust, but "retail sales of community bicycles have been weak, greatly affected by the impact of price increases resulting from the depreciation of the yen, and distributor inventories of community bicycles remained somewhat high."

Sales of sports bicycles in China also decreased compared to the first half of 2014. Shimano noted that Chinese distributors have maintained an appropriate level of bike inventory despite the softened market. 

The company did not release regional sales figures.

The company said "full-model changes of Deore XT and Acera mountain bike components and Tiagra road bike components were well received and order-taking was brisk."

The company has revised its fiscal year forecasts up from estimates released in late April. In the prior forecast, Shimano had called for a 7 percent sales increase for the year. Now it's calling for an 8 percent increase, to net sales of 360 billion yen and forecast operating income of 77 billion yen. It said it is closely watching the European economy, in particular, given the Greek debt crisis and its possible effect on currencies. It said it expects consumer spending to remain strong in the U.S.

"In these circumstances, the Shimano Group, while closely monitoring economic trends in Japan and overseas, is endeavoring to further enhance management efficiency. We will take the lead in the creation of new cycling culture and new sport fishing culture," the company said.

File Attachment:  Summary of Financial Results FY2015-1H.pdf
Categories: News

The Evolution of the Fred

Bike Snob NYC - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 11:13
Like New York City, London is an economic powerhouse, and wherever you find money you find Freds:


(Parking for one (1) Fred, spotted in London by a reader.)
But did you know that Fred Culture actually began in London?  It's true.  Consider this article from 1874, which chronicles the birth of the cycling craze, and in the process reveals what may be the very genesis of Fredness:


A form of amusement which appears to be becoming very popular in England is what is called “bicycling.”  

Great name, I love it!

Unfortunately, by the 20th century, Americans would shorten it to "biking," which they pronounce "bi-keen."

When bicycles were first introduced there was a disposition to treat them with ridicule, and many persons imagined that working a machine of this kind was simply a roundabout way of applying physical force in order to do what could be more effectively done by simply walking or running.  

This blows my mind.  Today, we're derided for not driving cars, yet 140 years ago our forbears were ridiculed for not simply running:


It's strangely comforting that we've been annoying people with our efficient machines ever since history's very first pedal stroke.

In the first instance, the machines were, of course, rather rough and clumsy, and very heavy into the bargain, and there is therefore some excuse for the contempt with which they were regarded.  But great improvements have lately been made both in their form and materials; the weight has been considerably reduced, higher wheels have been supplied, and various arrangements made by which the person working the bicycle is enabled to acquire a more thorough and easy command over its movements.

Behold, the Venge-Schmenge of its day:


According to reviewers of the time, it cornered like it was on stilts.

A school of daring and expert riders has also risen up; and though it is doubtful how far the bicycle will ever be introduced for the purposes of ordinary locomotion, it is evident that it is likely to take a prominent place as a form of competitive sport.

"Riding bicycles in order to get around?  Fie on that!  Bicycling's future lies in racing against ponies!"


(What, no helme(n)ts?)
A new class of sportsmen are thus introduced to the pleasures of the chase, and though the humbler riders on their five-pound velocipedes cannot keep pace with aristocratic rivals mounted on 200-guinea hunters, still they enjoy, to a great extent, the same sort of exhilaration and excitement.

Wow, that sounds like it's right out of Bicycling...1874:


(Bicycling 1874)
"The £5 Hi-Wheel Sport with its cast iron frame lacks the supple lightweight steel tubing of its 200-guinea sibling the Ultra-Hi SL, but it's an ideal rig for the entry-level rider interested in charity rides, quick jaunts to the country, and even the occasional pony race."

And so it was that Fred-dom was born.

By the way, this article also contains the first-ever recorded answer to the question "Whatgearyourunning?"

It may be mentioned that Stanton’s bicycle has a driving-wheel fifty-eight inches in diameter, and is under fifty pounds in weight.  Keen rode with a fifty-four-inch wheel, the weight of his machine being less than thirty-six pounds.

Keen was like totally spun out with that tiny wheel.

I wonder how many skid patches he had...

Of course, since then, competitive cycling has come a long way--by which I mean the drugs are way better:


Recent positive drug tests by two cyclists suggest there is a new, cutting-edge substance making its way to athletes looking for performance-enhancement: FG-4592, an experimental drug that increases production of red blood cells but has not yet been approved for human consumption.

FG-4592?  Sounds like a model of fixie from BikesDirect--and as it turns out it's just as easy to order online:

In theory, FG-4592 is available only to participants in clinical trials being conducted by AstraZeneca and FibroGen. The drug is in the final stage of testing, but not approved for sale.

But at least three chemical-supply companies sell FG-4592. A person can simply go to a website, click on FG-4592, add it to a cart, pay with a credit card, and even get it sent via overnight delivery. The hitch, though, is that the buyer has to be a researcher.

“You have to have something in writing saying you will be using it for research purposes,” said Jane Lee, a technical-support specialist at Selleck, a company that sells the compound and advertises it to be 99.36 percent pure. Lee added that the compound has to be sent to a university or research facility.

Fortunately, the Cipollini Bikes headquarters technically counts as a research center:


Sure, they don't have a wind tunnel like Specialized, but they do have a "Virility Chamber" where Cipollini himself has been conducting extensive research on the alleged link between cycling and impotence:


(The Cipollini Bikes Virility Chamber)
So far he hasn't found any, but he feels it's still too early to draw a conclusion.

Speaking of competitive cycling, cyclocross season will be here before you know it--but even if you're trying to ignore it you know it anyway, thanks to the incessant chatter on Twitter:
#CROSSISCORNING. pic.twitter.com/dxHXVK7a1j— Stevil Kinevil (@StevilKinevil) July 28, 2015I wonder how people even rode cyclocross before Twitter...

Oh, right, I forgot: before social networking there was no such thing as cyclocross.

It took disc brakes and hashtags in order to make the sport viable.

And of course under no circumstances should you attempt to engage in cyclocross without taking part in a "clinic" administered by an expert:


Sure it's just getting on and off your bike quickly, but it's different when you do it in a skinsuit.

Categories: Culture

Tour de France shows cyclists importance of not overlapping wheels, power-to ... - The Elkhart Truth (blog)

Google News | Cycling - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 11:10

The Elkhart Truth (blog)

Tour de France shows cyclists importance of not overlapping wheels, power-to ...
The Elkhart Truth (blog)
While watching the Tour de France, community blogger John D. Yoder was reminded of the importance of two basic cycling principles: not overlapping wheels and keeping a good power-to-weight ratio.
ONE Pro Cycling aim to become first British Pro Continental teamCyclingnews.com
Tour de France “hooliganism” must stop says world cycling chief following ...Mirror.co.uk
World cycling chief warns of increase in Tour de France hooliganismSouth China Morning Post (subscription)
The Star Online
all 57 news articles »
Categories: News

Parlee ESX in the Gran Prix of Beverly (Category 1) by Parlee...

I Am In Like With My Bike - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 11:00


Parlee ESX in the Gran Prix of Beverly (Category 1) by Parlee Cycles

Categories: Free

CateEye America hires Mountainview Sports Group for sales in the Southeast

Bicycle Retailer & Industry News - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 11:00

BOULDER, Colo. (BRAIN) — CatEye America has signed with Mountainview Sports Group for sales representation in the Southeast states of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Mississippi and Alabama.

Effective Aug. 1, Mountainview's John Greer and his sales force will be representing the newest lights and computers from CatEye along with its  portfolio of existing brands.

Greer said, "We look forward to representing such a strong brand. Needless to say, CatEye is, and always has been, an industry leader."

Bob Daniels, CatEye's vice president of sales and operations, said, "We are pleased to see the excitement John, Dave and John are bringing to the region and I am confident that their existing relationships, combined with CatEye's existing dealer base in the territory, will make this a successful partnership."

Mountainview Cycling also represents Defeet Int'l, Felt Bicycles, Louis Garneau, Saris Cycling Group, Sidi, Speedplay and Tifosi Optics.

Categories: News

Another outsider’s take: A British bike journalist on Portland

BikePortland - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 10:29
carlton reidCarlton Reid in Grant Park in June.
(Photo: J.Maus/BikePortland)

Many BikePortland readers are familiar with the work of Carlton Reid, a leading writer for the U.K. news outlet BikeBiz. As of last month, Reid is familiar with Portland, too.

Reid stopped through town for a few days on a tour promoting his new popular history of early bicycling, Roads Were Not Built for Cars. As a side project, he also put together one of the most concisely accurate summaries I’ve seen of Portland and biking at this moment in our history.

Here’s a passage from the piece published today on BikeBiz:

Bike commuters may dominate in some bohemian enclaves but across the city they make up just six percent of the total. This is stellar by U.S. standards – ten times the norm, in fact – but in comparison with, say, Copenhagen, it’s not even in the same galaxy.

Stats can be misleading though. When riding around Portland it’s clear this is a city where, in certain areas, cycling is perfectly normal, not just for getting to work but for running errands or riding to a night out. Bars and shops have bike-corrals (rows of cycle parking hoops instead of car parking spaces) and the light rail system is geared up to take bikes. Portland’s six percent modal share has to be seen in context – in 1990 it was just 1 percent. Between 2000 and 2008 the civic authority’s proactive bicycle programme helped add the other five percent, and the city has held it at that level ever since. Ten percent of kids cycle to school, nine percentage points higher than the U.S. national average.

- Advertisement -

Portland’s rich and diverse cycling cultures will easily maintain the existing modal share. The civic goal is to increase it to 25 percent within the next decade, and that’s a tough ask, even for a city that spawned Pedalpalooza, an annual 250-event from-the-street bike festival.

To increase cycling’s modal share it’s obvious that Portland’s car-use would have to be restricted, and hard infrastructure for cyclists would have to be built. Cycle use would then explode in Portland, profiting the city’s numerous bicycle businesses, making the city even more liveable, and not just for cyclists in gluten-free kilts.

It’s a nicely balanced piece that also describes our annoyingly but usefully fractured street grid as “staccato,” which I love. Check it out — and check out that book of Carlton’s, too, which has a tablet version with photos and video that pushes the boundaries of what a modern history book can and should be like.


The post Another outsider’s take: A British bike journalist on Portland appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Categories: Culture

Nuun launches its caffeinated sports drink tablets in Canada under new name

Bicycle Retailer & Industry News - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 10:25

SEATTLE (BRAIN) — Nuun and Company's caffeinated sports drink tablets, sold under the Energy name in the U.S., have been certified by Canadian authorities. In Canada, the tablets are being sold under the Boost name and are now available through its Canadian distributor, Red Pine Outdoor Equipment.

Boost was introduced to the Canadian athletic community at the Nike Women's 15K Toronto June 14-15, where Nuun was the on-course hydration sponsor. Sales in Canada began July 30 at MEC and other sports retailers.

Nuun Boost has a blend of B vitamins for energy metabolism, 40 mg of caffeine for increased endurance output and cognition, and the same electrolyte blend as Nuun Active Hydration tablets. The product contains no added sugars and fewer than 12 calories.

"We have taken the popular formula of Nuun Active Hydration and elevated it with essential B vitamins and moderate caffeine levels for sustained energy levels," said Kevin Rutherford, the president and CEO of Nuun. "Our consumers are very active, and the energy gain offered in Nuun Boost takes their athletic performance to the next level."

Nuun Boost is available in Canada with three flavors adapted from the Nuun Active Hydration line – Lemon Lime, Wild Berry and Cherry Limeade. The retail price is $7.49 for a tube including 10 tablets.

Categories: News

'Fat Guy' cycling across USA to save marriage - USA TODAY

Google News | Cycling - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 10:11

USA TODAY

'Fat Guy' cycling across USA to save marriage
USA TODAY
When Indiana-native Eric Hites hopped on his bike, he weighed 563 lbs. About 40 days later and 50 pounds lost, he's still riding. Inspired by the Proclaimers' 1988 hit "500 Miles," Hites embarked on a cross-country bike trip, in mid-June, to save his ...

and more »
Categories: News

Storey wins Para-cycling world gold

BBC Sport | Cycling - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 09:52
Britain's Dame Sarah Storey takes gold in the time trial at the Para-cycling Road World Championships.
Categories: News

After Tour de France success, MTN-Qhubeka left looking for new title sponsor

VeloNews - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 09:47

Daniel Teklehaimanot became the first African to wear the polka-dot jersey at the Tour de France this year. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

MILAN (VN) — Africa will continue to exist at the top level of cycling in 2016 and beyond. MTN-Qhubeka boss Doug Ryder said the future of his team “is secure” despite South African telecommunications company MTN pulling its sponsorship after a successful Tour de France.

The South African team made history in July. It became the first professional African team to participate in the Tour, its Eritrean cyclist Daniel Teklehaimanot became the first African to wear the polka-dot jersey, and Brit Steve Cummings won the team’s first Tour stage in Mende.

Ryder could not have hoped for more. He even points out that seven of his nine riders placed in the top 10 in a stage over the three weeks of racing. But before his flight from Paris to Johannesburg landed, the party streamers and confetti had been blown away by MTN.

“They blasted the message out there,” Ryder told VeloNews.

“That’s not the way we would’ve liked to have done it.”

MTN, which changed its South African CEO in mid-July, released a statement Wednesday that said not reviewing its contract was “normal business practice.”

It read, “Our partnership with the team has come full circle and we wish the team the absolute best in the future as we pass on the baton to the next sponsor.”

MTN’s agreement was due to end after this year, so Ryder had already been talking to his current sponsors and potential new ones during the Tour. Several of its secondary sponsors like Samsung and Dimension Data could step up to become the title sponsor for 2016 and beyond.

Dimension Data, which collected and supplied real-time data of cyclists during the Tour, began backing the team on July 1. Several reports say the South African software company could become the new sponsor and take over the team’s name, but Ryder explained that talks with companies are ongoing.

“In the next two or three weeks, we will announce the sponsor,” he said.

“Will the Tour help? The Tour de France was huge for the team, huge for African cycling, and huge for Africa. Steve’s win on Nelson Mandela Day had a major impact.”

The impact equated to the South African equivalent of $5.12 million worth of exposure in South Africa. With such a reach, a sponsor should be eager to head the team into its next chapter.

“But we will remain ‘sponsor name-Qhubeka’ next year. It will stay our team’s charity,” added Ryder. “And we will remain South African.”

Instead of giving money, Qhubeka gains exposure from the team. The non-profit group gives bicycles to poor Africans in exchange for work such as growing 200 trees to 30 centimeters or collecting 4,500 plastic bottles.

The only change is that MTN leaves after nine years of title sponsorship, including seeing the team into the Pro Continental ranks and through the 2014 Vuelta a España and the 2015 Tour de France on wildcard invitations.

“My gut feeling is that we will not apply for a WorldTour license,” Ryder added.

“We will likely stay in the second division for 2016. We’ve done everything on a step-by-step basis, and the next step will need some time and planning.

“It was a big move in the professional continental division, and we need to make sure we are stable before going up to the WorldTour. Other teams have come and gone from the WorldTour, or are there now and not doing so well.”

The team keeps rolling through 2015. It has the Larry H. Miller Tour of Utah, the Vuelta a España, and the Tour of Britain on the horizon. Between making management decisions, Ryder must also find time to sign a new sponsor agreement.

He added before returning to tend to several tasks, “The team will stay unique, African and alongside the Qhubeka charity.”

The post After Tour de France success, MTN-Qhubeka left looking for new title sponsor appeared first on VeloNews.com.

Categories: News

Photo Essay: Tour de France, week 3

VeloNews - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 08:53

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  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 17

    The third week of the 2015 Tour commenced with one of the worst days in his career for the American GC contender Tejay van Garderen, as a persistent illness forced him from the race on stage 17. Photo: Léon van Bon | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 17

    After struggling in the opening weeks, defending champion Vincenzo Nibali was keen to show his improving form as the race tackled the Alps. Photo: Jim Fryer | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 17

    Simon Geschke arrived at the finish in Pra Loup in a state of glory, saying later that he had dreamed of this moment since he was 15 years old. Photo: Iri Greco | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 17

    Andrew Talansky gave it a go on the climb up to Pra Loup, but continued to struggle throughout the Tour in his pursuit of the podium in Paris. Photo: Iri Greco | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 18

    The Col de Glandon was featured in three stages, as the Tour rode over these same roads on stages 18-20 — much to the delight of the campers that planted themselves there. Photo: Iri Greco | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 18

    Eventual stage winner Romain Bardet hit the lower slopes of the Lacets de Montvernier in stage 18. Photo: Jim Fryer | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 18

    The view from two-thirds of the way up the Lacets de Montvernier as the race leaders climbed the 18 hairpins in less than 3.5 kilometers. Photo: Iri Greco | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 18

    Pierre Roland was one of a few riders to see their form turn around in the final days of the Tour. Photo: Jim Fryer | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 18

    Despite poor form and some bad luck, Alberto Contador was still smiling for the media after another hard day in the Alps. Photo: Jim Fryer | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 19

    A fan for all was perched high above the road waiting eagerly for the riders to ascend the Col du Glandon. Photo: Jim Fryer | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 19

    Maillot jaune holder Chris Froome rode through the descent of the Col du Chaussy at the beginning of stage 19. Photo: Léon van Bon | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 19

    Chris Froome was put under pressure on the Col du Glandon, as there were numerous attacks in the final 5km before the summit. Photo: Jim Fryer | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 19

    Looking for more than two minutes to make up on race leader Chris Froome, Colombian climber Nairo Quintana attacked hard with 4km to go in stage 19. Photo: Jim Fryer | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 19

    Vincenzo Nibali made a bold move to attack while Chris Froome had a mechanical on the Col de la Croix de Fer, and Nibali went on to claim a solo victory in La Toussuire. Photo: Iri Greco | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 19

    Nairo Quintana proved once again that he is a force to be reckoned with, and even more so as the race neared its last grueling days. Photo: Iri Greco | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 20

    The long-awaited scene at the Dutch Corner on Alpe d'Huez came on the penultimate stage. Photo: Iri Greco | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 20

    Vincenzo Nibali rode into the orange smoke-filled tunnel of crazed fans at Dutch Corner on the Alpe d'Huez. Photo: Iri Greco | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 20

    Jean-Christophe Peraud rode through the inferno of the Alpe with many of his battle scars still evident. Photo: Iri Greco | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 20

    Frenchman Thibaut Pinot made up for a failed GC attempt with a solo victory atop the famed Alpe d'Huez. Photo: Jim Fryer | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 20

    Chris Froome managed to contain an attacking Nairo Quintana, limiting his losses with Alejandro Valverde in tow. Photo: Jim Fryer | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 20

    The stage to Alpe d'Huez was one of the shortest of the Tour, but it pushed Chris Froome to his limit by the finish. Photo: Jim Fryer | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 20

    The Cannondale-Garmin duo of Dan Martin and Andrew Talansky was completely spent at the finish on the Alpe. Photo: Jim Fryer | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 21

    The Champs-Élysées saw the Tour de France grace its cobblestones once again on the streets of Paris. Photo: Jim Fryer | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 21

    Chris Froome arrived in Paris under the guard of teammate Nicolas Roche, with his Sky team leading the peloton. Photo: Jim Fryer | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 21

    Lotto Soudal led the charge on the final laps into the finish on the Champs-Élysées as it prepared to launch Andre Greipel to the line for the win in Paris. Photo: Ludovic Grenier | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 21

    Chris Froome chased back through a maze of vehicles after a fast food wrapper got snagged on his bike, forcing him to stop on the side of the road. Photo: Iri Greco | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 21

    Andre Greipel stormed to his fourth stage win on the most famous boulevard in the world, the Champs-Élysées. Photo: Jim Fryer | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 21

    Alexander Kristoff came up short in Paris against the continued domination of Andre Greipel. Photo: Iri Greco | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 21

    Chris Froome rolled into Paris with his Sky team at his side as he claimed his second Tour de France title. Photo: Jim Fryer | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 21

    Alberto Contador appeared calm within the storm after a whirlwind Tour of disappointment. Photo: Iri Greco | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 21

    After a spring season of strong performances, John Degenkolb arrived in Paris empty-handed. Photo: Iri Greco | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 21

    Set to leave Sky at the end of 2015, Richie Porte went out with a bang as he faithfully rode in service to race winner Chris Froome. Photo: Jim Fryer | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 21

    Two-time Tour de France winner Chris Froome rolled toward the final podium ceremony after an emotional embrace with wife Michelle Cound. Photo: Iri Greco | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 21

    Chris Froome walked off the podium as the newly crowned Tour de France champion. Photo: Jim Fryer | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France: Stage 21

    The final podium of the 2015 Tour de France. Photo: Jim Fryer | BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

The post Photo Essay: Tour de France, week 3 appeared first on VeloNews.com.

Categories: News

Abu Dhabi to host inaugural UCI Cycling Gala - Cyclingnews.com

Google News | Cycling - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 08:09

Cyclingnews.com

Abu Dhabi to host inaugural UCI Cycling Gala
Cyclingnews.com
After staging its first professional race, Abu Dhabi has confirmed that it will play host to the inaugural UCI Cycling Gala at the end of this year. The UCI Gala is set to take place at the Yas Marina Formula One circuit following the final night stage ...

and more »
Categories: News

Cookson concerned about ‘hooliganism’ along Tour de France route

VeloNews - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 07:43

UCI President Brian Cookson said he's concerned about fans getting too close to riders during races. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

KUALA LUMPUR (AFP) — World cycling chief Brian Cookson has warned of a rise in “hooliganism” on Tour de France routes and said winner Chris Froome was the target of nasty insults.

After one of the most controversial races in recent years, Cookson also told AFP in an interview that the number of “tired” riders on the Tour made him believe tougher doping tests are having an impact.

“There were some regrettable incidents on the Tour,” the UCI president said on the sidelines of International Olympic Committee meetings in Kuala Lumpur.

“I am worried about the beginnings of an element of hooliganism coming towards our sport which we have largely been able to avoid in recent years.

“Everyone needs to be a little bit careful for the future.”

He pointed out Briton Froome’s claims that urine and beer were thrown at him and crowds spat at him following French media reports casting doubt on his performances. There was also vandalism.

Cookson said the incidents could be “isolated,” but they had made him “very uncomfortable.”

“I think Chris was subjected to a fairly nasty form of antagonism from a small number of people,” he said.

“But there was also a little bit of slightly joking, slightly hooligan-type behavior in places with cars being kicked, things being thrown at cars.”

Bearded cross-dressers and fans in superhero outfits have traditionally mixed with beer-swilling spectators along routes. But Cookson said French authorities shared his concerns and warned that the freedom around cycling could be at risk.

“Over the years I have become more and more worried about people running alongside riders, pushing riders and so on, and we are getting to a point where that’s beginning to be a little more concerning.

“The Tour, all of cycle racing is a great free sport. It is possible to get close to the athletes, to the competitors, in a way that is not really possible in any other sport. If we want that to continue then we all have a responsibility to behave.”

When asked about Froome’s treatment, the UCI leader from Britain said it was not his job “to speak up for or defend any individual rider or any individual team.”

‘Efficient’ drug testing

“My job is to ensure that the conditions in which our sport takes place are as fair and equitable as possible and with as much integrity and impartiality as possible,” Cookson said.

Cycling has handed its drug testing over to the independent Cycling Anti-Doping Foundation in a system hailed by the World Anti-Doping Agency.

A recent WADA report said that 56 percent of tests on athletes in all sports with biological passports now concerns cycling. Cookson said cycling should be “proud” of this record of attention.

“I think we saw some very tired riders during the Tour and one of the things I take from that is that the dope testing is becoming ever more efficient.

“Whilst no one likes to see anyone exhausted, I think it is a demonstration that we are constantly lowering the radar.

“People should bear that in mind when they are casting allegations and aspersions on any individual whoever they may be, whatever nationality, whatever team” he added, in a further reference to media attacks on Froome.

Cookson said no UCI official can order a rider to be tested or not tested.

“There isn’t a conflict of interest.” Cookson also strenuously denied that Froome’s team Sky or any other team got preferential treatment.

“Absolutely not.”

“I can give you a personal guarantee that I will never cover up any anti-doping violation,” Cookson said. “If we think that someone, whoever it is, however high, however low, whatever team, whatever nationality, is involved in an anti-doping violation that can be prosecuted, then we will prosecute.”

The post Cookson concerned about ‘hooliganism’ along Tour de France route appeared first on VeloNews.com.

Categories: News

Orbea Loki does double wheel-size duty

Bicycle Retailer & Industry News - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 07:00

MALLABIA, Spain (BRAIN) — The Loki trail hardtail features Orbea's new Double Duty concept, with the ability to run either 29-inch or 27-plus wheels via Boost hub spacing front and rear.

A PF30 bottom bracket shell gives riders the option of using aftermarket eccentric BBs to convert the Loki to singlespeed duty, and the slack (67-degree head angle), triple-butted alloy frame includes internal routing for dropper posts.

Orbea is offering the Loki in three 27-plus builds and two 29er specs. The top-of-the-line Loki 27+ H-LTD is outfitted with a Fox 34 Factory 120 FIT4 Kashima Boost fork, Shimano XT 1-by-11 drivetrain, Orbea tubeless 40-millimeter-wide 27-plus disc wheels, Shimano M506 brakes, Race Face 35-millimeter bars and stem, and a RockShox Reverb Stealth dropper post.

More information: orbea.com/int-en/sites/loki.

Categories: News
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