NCC: Alzate and Rivera maintain NCC leads after Charlotte-Belmont Omnium

USA Cycling News - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 11:45
The NCC continued last weekend with the Charlotte-Belmont Omnium in North Carolina.
Categories: News

When Traffic Deaths Don’t Make the News: Jelani Irving, 22

Streetsblog New York City - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 11:09

Jelani Irving. Photo from the Irving family via Ghost Bike Project

Jelani Irving. Photo from the Irving family via Ghost Bike Project

While NYC traffic deaths are down in the first few months of 2014, they are still so frequent that not every fatality gets reported in the news. This is often the case when a victim dies from injuries in the hospital days after a crash. That’s what happened earlier this year to 22-year-old Jelani Irving.

Irving was critically injured just before 6:15 a.m. on February 2 while riding his bike at the intersection of Classon Avenue and Washington Avenue in Crown Heights. Irving’s sister, Imani Irving, said he was riding his bike home from work after his shift as a yellow cab driver.

Police say Irving was struck by a 61-year-old man driving a 1999 Nissan Maxima northbound on Washington. The driver was turning right onto Classon — a turn with a very obtuse angle that motorists can make at speed — and struck Irving as he was cycling south in the northbound lane. NYPD says Irving veered left, crossing the path of the driver. The driver was cited for two equipment violations; press reports at the time said they were for bald rear tires. There were no citations or arrests related to Irving’s death.

Irving, unconscious and in cardiac arrest, was taken to Kings County Hospital and classified by NYPD as likely to die. He died of his injuries four days later.

The crash was covered by the Brooklyn Paper and Gothamist but it was not known that it caused Irving’s death until his name later appeared in WNYC’s “Mean Streets” traffic fatalities tracker.

Irving’s cousin, Daniel Gregoire, works at a Unitarian church in Pennsylvania and wrote about his family’s loss on the church’s website:

Many of you know that last week my dear cousin Jelani died as a result of the injuries he sustained when his bicycle and a car collided in New York. He was 22 years old. My family is coping with the loss in the many ways that families come to grips with a tragedy that takes away a beloved member, seemingly well before his time. Folks were upset, crying, consoling and seeking to be consoled. Even for me, at this present moment there is a kind of “unreality” to the events that have transpired. Periodically, I find myself wondering if this event, his death, even really happened. Of course, I know for a fact that it has, Jelani is dead, and life for my family will be very different as we move towards healing.

In moments like these, everyone searches for answers. Right now, the facts of the accident are emerging: there was fog, perhaps black ice, an intersection with a confusing geometry, it was early morning. The impact of a 2,000 lb. car on 160 pounds of flesh, even at the city speed limit is enough to cause catastrophic injury if the conditions are right. I know that “why” is seldom a useful question in times like these, but time and time again I find myself coming back to the “why.”

“We all have the right to the road,” Imani Irving told Streetsblog. ”There’s no word to describe the feelings we have at this time.”

The Ghost Bike Project, which memorializes cyclists who have died on New York City streets, notes on its website that, at the request of Irving’s family, it did not install a memorial at the site of his death.

This post has been updated to reflect that after publication, Irving’s sister, Imani Irving, contacted Streetsblog with additional information.

Categories: Culture

Lowering the bar

Vintage One - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 11:06
Is this next?An interesting thing happened the other day and it has changed things up a bit regarding the way I set up bikes.  I was unboxing a test bike and it had a very aggressive bar position, that being low and somewhat far out there.  It was a XC/Endurance focused FS 29er, so that was not out of the norm for a cockpit set-up, but it was a bit much for me.

I went to swap the stem position, but hesitated, thinking I would 'try it their way' first.  In time, and really a very short time, I found I liked it.  Never moved that handlebar.

In fact I took my Specialized Epic, a similar bike, to a 10mm longer stem and flipped it negative.  I liked it.

Then I rode my single speed, a bike I had been happy with the set-up on, and felt like I was on a beach cruiser, that h-bar being high and in my lap.  Huh!  So I flipped that stem too.  Now I was weighting the front wheel better and was happy.  How odd.

And it goes to show that you can get used to anything, even the wrong thing.  It took a couple of bikes lately to point that out.  One was the long, low XC FS bike with the flipped stem and the others were a couple of 130mm/140mm travel Fs bikes.  But that taught me another lesson and one a bit different then the XC bike.

"Longer stems on smaller frames can be a good thing."

  I typically ride an XL, but I am a bit of a tweener in sizing.  I can go either way, often as not.  But I have found that the two bikes, both pretty big 29er trail bikes, were better to ride in a smaller frame (LG) with a longer stem (100mm).  I found that the smaller frame and the resulting shorter wheelbase gave me a good dose of maneuverability often missing in XL bikes and the longer stem was weighting the front wheel, which was already closer under me due to the frame size reduction.

And that was an epiphany.  In a short time, I reversed the long march I had been on to shorter stems and longer bikes and I am stunned by how much better it was, at least on the long travel bikes.

It goes to show that old dogs can indeed learn new tricks and it pays to experiment with stuff like cockpit setup now and again.
Categories: Free

Bonk Breaker adds new protein bar flavor

Bicycle Retailer & Industry News - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 10:52

SANTA MONICA, Calif. (BRAIN) — Bonk Breaker has added a third flavor to its protein bar lineup, Peanut Butter & Chocolate Chip.

The new flavor continues Bonk Breaker's philosophy of baking simple, high quality, real food ingredients into great tasting bars.

"We've seen huge demand for our protein bar products since introducing the first two flavors, Peanut Butter & Jelly and Almond Cherry Chunk," said Bonk Breaker co-CEO and founder Jason Winn. "For the third addition to the high protein bar family we went for a classic favorite – Peanut Butter & Chocolate Chip – and spent a year perfecting the flavor profile and ingredients. We were committed to maintaining a clean ingredient list of real food that tastes great, which differentiates the Bonk Breaker Protein line from other protein bars on the market."

The 62 gram bar has 13 grams of protein from brown rice protein and nuts. The bars offer a 2:1 ratio of carbohydrate to protein, helping to restore depleted carbohydrate glycogen stores after exercise. Like all Bonk Breaker bars, the new flavor is gluten and dairy free.

Bonk Breaker is the official nutrition bar of Ironman, USA Cycling and the USA Cycling Team.

More information: bonkbreaker.com.

Categories: News

Támogasd a Cyclechic-et két gombnyomással!

Hungarian Cycle Chic - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 10:42

Idén először hirdették meg a Radical Democracy videópályázatot, melyre 4 kategóriában lehetett nevezni egész Európából. A verseny kiírói olyan videókat vártak, melyek megoldásokat keresnek a gazdasági és politikai válságra helyi vagy akár nemzetközi szinten. A Cyclechic.hu - megtörve a politizálós vonalat - két eddigi I Bike Budapest videóját küldte a versenybe. Az oka elég konkrét: biciklivel jobbá lehet tenni a városainkat.

video_thumbnail.jpg

Négy kategóriában (helyi hősök, kamu politikai videók, időkapszula, újratervezett Európa) lehetett nevezni. A hónap végén egy nemzetközi zsűri kiválaszt 10 filmet, az első öt film 2500, a második 5 film 1000 eurós díjat kap. Mi az alábbi két videónkkal az "időkapszula" kategóriát erősítjük, hátha 50 év múlva majd kíváncsian nézik a bringázást legtermészetesebb módon űző magyarok, hogy "jé, egyszer ilyen is volt".

A szervezők április 27-ig várják a közönség szavazatait, az 5 legtöbb szavazatot kapó videó bekerül a díjazottak közé. Mi nagyon szeretnénk nyerni és ehhez kérnénk a céljainkat támogató olvasóink segítségét.

A versengő videók elérhetőek innen, a szavazat leadásához csupán egy facebook-os bejelentkezésre és a VOTE gomb megnyomására van szükség, miután a videók aloldalaira jutottunk egy kattintással. Azért be is ágyazzuk őket itt alább, az egyes videók címére kattintva pedig a már említett szavazóoldalra lehet jutni. Egy ember max. 5 videóra szavazhat.

I bike Budapest 2013

 

I love Budapest - I bike Budapest

Ha tetszett a poszt, nyomj egy lájkot és kövesd a blogot a facebookon!

Megosztom Facebookon! Megosztom iWiWen! Megosztom Twitteren! Megosztom Google Buzzon! Megosztom Google Readeren! Megosztom Tumblren!

Categories: Style

New BRAIN issue features in-depth look at bike pricing

Bicycle Retailer & Industry News - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 10:41

LAGUNA HILLS, Calif. (BRAIN) — The April 15 issue of Bicycle Retailer & Industry News, arriving in mailboxes this week, features an in-depth examination of retail bike pricing, inspired by the reduced pricing promotion announced by Giant USA last month.

BRAIN editor Lynette Carpiet spoke with Giant executive director of sales John "JT" Thompson, Accell North America's Chris Speyer and retailers from coast to coast as she examined Giant's program and its potential effect on the industry. Charlie McCorkell, owner of the New York City chain Bicycle Habitat, a Trek and Specialized dealer, said the program could work to bring more newbies into the activity of cycling  — via IBDs, instead of other retail options. But the verdict is still out and McCorkell worries that it won't have enough impact. "Are we just transferring the $450 customer to a $300 bike?" McCorkell asked.

The April 15 BRAIN also features full coverage of the North American Handmade Bicycle Show in Charlotte, N.C. Freelance writer Patrick Brady gives an overview of the show and what the innovations and craftsmanship on display might influence the bikes on dealer salesfloors in seasons to come.

Also in the issue is a look at Sidi's newest U.S. distributor, Ciclista America, and a look back at the Italian shoe brand's long history in the U.S., leading up to its turbulent recent history, when the brand has gone through three distributors in five years. While Sidi's market share in the U.S. has plummeted in recent years, Ciclista America says it's focused on fundamentals. That includes enforcing a MAP policy, cleaning up gray market sales, increasing U.S. inventory and improving distribution efficiency. "The last few years have been pretty confusing out there for the brand in the States," conceded Ciclista owner Bill Berroth. "It's taken a bit of a hit on the marketing or wholesale level — never with the product, but more in a logistical way."

The April 15 issue also includes a look at Accell North America's new strategy with its distributor SBS; Shimano's new strategy to increase dealer education programs but reduce its Interbike presence; a look at new product introductions from SRAM and Shimano; and industry veteran Harry Manko's insights on the history of the bike industry in the U.S.

If you are not receiving BRAIN, please visit the BRAIN subscription page.

Categories: News

Carmel Author: Cycling an emerging sport - Current in Carmel

Google News | Cycling - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 10:33

Current in Carmel

Carmel Author: Cycling an emerging sport
Current in Carmel
“I had a friend who was getting into road cycling, and we started watching the Tour de France, and seeing Greg Lemond winning the Tour in 1986, it just seemed exotic and we got into it from there,” Lee said. “(Cycling) is a wonderful escape and form of ...

Categories: News

Photo

benjaminjtaylor - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 10:32


Categories: Fixed

Tech scenes from the 2014 Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

VeloNews - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 10:13

$(document).ready(function() { $(".fancybox").fancybox({margin : [20, 60, 20, 60]}); }); $(document).ready(function() { $('.marquee-324409').carousel({ slider: '.slider', slide: '.slide', slideHed: '.slidehed', nextSlide : '.p-next', nextSlide2 : '.p-next-img', prevSlide : '.p-prev', addPagination: false, addNav : false, speed: 600 }); $('.p-next').click(function() { $('#post-slider-secondary').trigger('nextprev', { dir: 'next' }); _gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'Image Gallery Carousel', 'Next', 'Image Gallery Carousel Next Button']); googletag.pubads().refresh(); }); $('.p-next-img').click(function() { $('#post-slider-secondary').trigger('nextprev', { dir: 'next' }); _gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'Image Gallery Carousel', 'Next', 'Image Gallery Carousel Next Image']); googletag.pubads().refresh(); }); $('.p-prev').click(function() { $('#post-slider-secondary').trigger('nextprev', { dir: 'prev' }); _gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'Image Gallery Carousel', 'Previous', 'Image Gallery Carousel Previous Button']); googletag.pubads().refresh(); }); $('.carousel-nav').css('display', 'block'); $('.slide').css('margin-right', '0'); $('.slideHed').css('display', 'block'); $('.cover.secondary').css('max-height', '100%'); $('#post-slider-secondary .slide').css('height', '100%');$('.view-full-image').css('display', 'block'); $('.slide p').css('display', 'block'); $('#post-slider-secondary .slide').removeAttr('width');}); 1 of {count} Back to Start
  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    With cyclocross season opening in early September, the Sea Otter Classic is an ideal place for manufacturers to launch new ’cross bikes. Raleigh, like many brands launched updated models last week, including two new carbon models. The new RXC Pro sports front and rear thru axles and increased mud clearance. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    Raleigh uses its own carbon fork on the new RXC and RXC Pro carbon race bikes. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    Raleigh was able to add a bit of mud clearance at the bottom bracket by removing a reinforcement bridge. Tires shown are 33mm Clements. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    A new belt-drive singlespeed from Raleigh, the RXS, should retail near $1,400 as a complete bike with hydraulic TRP Hylex brakes. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    The Strava van made the trip down to Sea Otter from its homebase in San Francisco. Strava employees set up short Segment Challenges around the festival, and athletes were able to upload rides on the solar-powered computers in the Mercedes Sprinter van. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    Thule backpacks have taken hold in Apple stores, so the tech giant asked Thule if it would be interested in making iPhone cases. The result is Thule's new Atmos and Gauntlet cases. The Atmos cases here offer a bit more protection than the Gauntlet. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    The Atmos case offers protection up to a 6-foot drop. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    The Atmos case (left) and the Gauntlet case should offer some competition for Otterbox. The Gauntlet is more of a simple snap-on case and provides little shock protection, and the Atmos case should be competitive with the Otterbox Symmetry case. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    Thule will also offer iPad and iPad Air cases. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    It's not a tiny Thule load bar; it's actually a flashdrive. This is one flashdrive I didn't lose. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    The new $200 Thule Covert Camera bag is a Reddot Design Award winner in the camera category. The Covert offers storage for one camera body and two lenses in a removeable storage unit that's accessed from a side pocket. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    The Perspektiv Backpack has been Thule's flagship camera bag and offers quite a bit more camera storage, but lacks some of the auxilary storage of the new Covert bag. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    The Perspektiv Backpack offers a lot of camera storage. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    Paris-Roubaix winner Nikki Terpstra rode a version of these Specialized tires made by Francois Marie, also known as FMB. They sport a Specialized tread with added puncture resistance on a supple FMB cotton casing. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    The Specialized S-Works Turbo tire has ridden a rollercoaster of success with the Omega Pharma-Quick Step team. In celebration of the team riding it to multiple world championships, Specialized is printing the rainbow stripes on the sidewall. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    Lapierre's Pulsium endurance road bike, as ridden by FDJ.fr at the classics. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    The Pulsium sports an elastomer shock absorber that will give 3.5mm of vertical compliance. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    A curvy fork is intended to offer more front-end compliance to the Pulsium. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    Tifosi is offering budget-minded prescription shades. The Veloce is $100 with a prescription-ready lens. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    The Podium XC offers a great range of view with its shield lens design. This Clarion Yellow version will be available in June. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    The Weevil Yuk Sak is for stashing your smelly cycling gear. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    The Yuk Sak has a pocket with a Silca Bead stash that absorbs the funky moisture from the Yuk Sak. The Yuk Sak is great for stashing smelly riding clothes in your backpack after a morning ride at Sea Otter. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    Fouriers is a Taiwanese manufacturer that has been producing components for different brands for years. Now its own products are available in the US. These brakes are designed for the Giant Propel to offer Propel riders a firmer braking option. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    Fouriers makes a jockey wheel upgrade, like the one Fabian Cancellara rides, for the Shimano 11-speed rear derailleurs. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    Fouriers makes chainrings and this special guide ring, which comes apart in two pieces. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    That's not an optical illusion, this Fourier bar has a concave shape at the grip, which Fourier refers to as Control Curve Technology. The bar is still in the prototype phase. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    Barfly is looking to compete with K-Edge with its new Barfly Sli Fly. The Sli Fly allows riders to mount a Shimano or Campagnolo electronic control box under the Garmin head unit. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    Barfly Sli Fly users could also mount a GoPro under the head unit. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    The Barfly Hopper Saddle Bag is actually just straps that retain your items in a coffee bag. Pick your favorite coffee bag and cinch it under your saddle. Without needing to wrap around the seatpost, the Hopper Saddle bag is great for mountain bikers riding dropper posts. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    Barfly also makes mounts for Powertap Joule computers and can produce custom decals for team orders. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    Spy Optics is bringing its Happy Lens technology to the Screw cycling frame. Happy Lens technology is intended to bring out colors more vibrantly and actually help with seasonal depression in places that see lower amounts of sunlight. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    The Wahoo Fitness Rflkt head unit is powered by the Wahoo application on an iPhone. Users listening to music while riding can even change tracks through the head unit. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    Continental is bringing two new 27.5-inch all-mountain tires to market this summer. The Baron and Der Kaiser were co-developed with the Atherton family of mountain bike extraordinaires. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    The Der Kaiser (left) and the Baron use more material for puncture resistance and strength. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    The Poc Do blades, worn by Garmin-Sharp, aren't for everyone, but the full wrap and distinctive look are definitely eye-catching. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    Robert Egger, Specialized's head designer, had his personal Venge quietly on display outside the Specialized booth. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    Egger's seatpost is some sort of custom design — one of the perks of directing the design team for one of cycling's biggest brands. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Tech scenes from Sea Otter Classic, Round 2

    The Team Stumpjumper Pink paint scheme on Egger's bike is obviously a one-off, but does resemble the pink Crux frames made in recent years. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com

The post Tech scenes from the 2014 Sea Otter Classic, Round 2 appeared first on VeloNews.com.

Categories: News

Photo

benjaminjtaylor - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 10:13


Categories: Fixed

Zack Grice named publisher of Bicycling magazine

Bicycle Retailer & Industry News - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 10:11

EMMAUS, Pa. (BRAIN) — Zack Grice has been named publisher of Bicycling magazine. Grice had been the magazine's associate publisher for sales and marketing since last September.

Chris Lambiase had acted as the magazine's publisher since 2004. He has also been a senior vice president and group publisher since 2008, and will continue in those roles.

Grice is a 16-year veteran at Bicycling, and the company said he has overseen a turnaround at the magazine since his promotion last fall. In 2014, the magazine is up 16.9 percent in revenue through May and up 11.8 percent in pages over last year. The April 2014 issue alone was up 36 percent in revenue and 32 percent in pages year over year, while the May 2014 issue was up 23 percent in revenue and 16 percent in pages.

"Zack has played a key role in the Bicycling brand's impressive performance through the first part of 2014," Lambiase said. "I am confident that his energy, enthusiasm and creativity will translate into continued successful results for Bicycling magazine as Zack ascends into the publisher's role."

Grice has been instrumental in launching branded events such as Bicycling's Dream Rides. He has spearheaded the Bicycling Fall Classic, which will run for the fourth time in October in Pennsylvania, and the Bicycling Spring Classic, debuting in May in California, securing Specialized as a presenting sponsor for both events.

"I'm proud to lead the Bicycling brand at a time when the sport and culture of cycling are so strong and diverse, and when our voice fosters a better experience for riders of every stripe," Grice said. "The surround-sound of Bicycling's award-winning media properties, advocacy initiatives and branded events give us so many exciting ways to connect our marketing partners with millions of active adults for whom cycling promises focus, balance and achievement."

Categories: News

DC Inspires Bike Lane Envy With Curb-Protected Cycling

Streetsblog New York City - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 10:11

The new 1st Street curb-protected bike lane takes shape. Photo: BeyondDC/Flickr

Here’s a good sign that protected bike lanes are here to stay in American cities: Cities are increasingly trading plastic bollards for concrete curbs, making the lanes a more permanent feature of the landscape.

As I reported for People for Bikes last year, Chicago, Austin, Seattle, New York and Portland have all either installed or plan to install curb-protected bike lanes. The latest city to join this elite group is Washington, DC.

Dan Malouff at Greater Greater Washington explains the new bike lanes coming to M Street and 1st Street in the nation’s capital:

Their designs are a step up from previous DC cycletracks, since they each include spots — though on M, a very brief spot — where a full concrete curb separates bikes from cars.

The 1st Street NE cycletrack connects the Metropolitan Branch Trail to Union Station and downtown DC. DDOT installed its curb last week, from K Street to M Street. Crews are still working on striping and signals, but the project is close to opening.

The M Street cycletrack is longer than 1st Street’s overall, but the portion with a curb is shorter. It’s less than one block, where the cycletrack briefly curves onto Rhode Island Avenue in order to approach Connecticut Avenue more safely. Officials say the M Street cycletrack is a week or two from opening.

Typically DDOT uses plastic bollards instead of curbs. The bollards are less expensive, easier to install, and can be removed occasionally to perform street maintenance. But they’re less attractive and less significant as a physical barrier, compared to a curb.

Elsewhere on the Network today: Treehugger reports that Ontario is planning to install bike infrastructure as part of all future  provincial highway and bridge projects. And CincyMap argues that a new study touting the “efficiency” of Cincinnati’s SORTA transit agency really signifies how poorly funded the agency is.

Categories: Culture

CRITERIO FIXED

Juice Studio - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 09:57

Save de date! CRITERIO FIXED, a Criterium de pinhao fixo do Rio de Janeiro vai acontecer dia 17 de Maio, no Maracanã!

criterio_fixed
Mais infos AQUI.

Categories: Fixed

Osprey Shuttle: Rolling Monolith

Bike Hugger - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 09:40

HUGE BAG

Osprey Shuttle 32

This bag arrived, so huge, it’s like a monolith to gear and travel being discovered. I placed it outside for filtered-light photos this morning. After the pug furiously barked at it, apparently concerned an alien intruder was in the yard, I thought the toddlers next door could pretend it was a spaceship from planet Osprey too!

Monolithic

Like a Monolith

You can stuff your courage AND all your gear in this hauler before your next big trip to race and ride. The Shuttle 32” / 110L is available from Amazon and a retailer near you for $299.95

32

All the gear you own in one bag

Categories: Culture

Cycling Legalese: Does the Bike Lane Compel You?

Urban Velo - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 09:39

bkevinidesCycling Legalese is our online cycling law column from everyday cyclist and Chicago based injury lawyer, Brendan Kevenides.

Ever expanding bicycle infrastructure is awesome, hands down. But are you compelled to use a bike lane or separated path if it exists, even if it is in disrepair or otherwise not suitable? Read on.

Q:There are new bike lanes popping up all over. That’s cool, but do I have to ride in them?

Bike lanes are awesome, except when they’re not. As someone who has been riding in the big bad city for decades, I am thrilled at the proliferation of bike specific infrastructure in my town and others nationwide. Our cities are evolving. However, no big North American city can claim to be on par with bike meccas like Amsterdam and Copenhagen. In the evolutionary timeline we have crawled out of the primordial ooze, but we are still pretty wet behind the ears. Sometimes bike lanes, and other cycle specific infrastructure, suck. Thankfully, in most places bicyclists are not required to use bike lanes or separated paths.

There are several reasons why a cyclist might choose not to ride in a bike lane. It may be in disrepair, full of potholes, ruts or broken glass. Leaving the bike lane may be the safe thing to do. It is common in U.S. cities for the lanes to be occupied illegally by cars, delivery trucks or other vehicles. Here in Chicago, buses are permitted to share bicycle lanes with people on bikes. In the winter months, bike paths maybe rendered impassable due to the accumulation of snow and ice. There are even times when cycling on a path or in a bike lane clear of obstructions just does not make sense. For example, a roadie on a training ride may be advised to avoid a path crowded with cyclists traveling at a more leisurely pace.

There once was a time when the majority of U.S. states had what are commonly referred to as “mandatory use laws,” that is laws that require cyclists to use a bike specific path or other designated area located adjacent to a regular travel lane. These laws were more common at a time when there were actually fewer such paths in existence, and virtually no bike lanes in North American cities. According to the League of American Bicyclists, “In the 1970s, mandatory use laws of some sort existed in 38 states.” Now, however, there are far fewer such laws, many having been repealed. Illinois’ vehicle code has no mandatory use requirement. Until recently, the municipal code of Chicago had such a requirement which read, “Whenever a usable path for bicycles has been provided adjacent to a roadway, bicycle riders shall use such path and shall not use the roadway.” The ordinance did not define what a usable path was. Was it a bike lane with nothing more than a painted line separating cars and bikes? Or, was more substantial separation required, like a jersey barrier? This vagueness ultimately lead to repeal of the ordinance in June, 2013.

Cyclists throughout Illinois and in places like Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, and many others cyclists may ignore bike lanes and paths for any reason. In other jurisdictions a cyclist’s right to do so is qualified. For example, in California a bicyclist must use a bicycle lane where one is provided, unless he or she is traveling at the same speed as traffic moving in the same direction. California bikers may also abandon the lane when overtaking another bicyclist or pedestrian, when preparing to turn left, to avoid debris or hazardous conditions or when approaching a place where a right turn is authorized. The law in New York seems to be the same. Where there are bike lanes, cyclists have to use them. It appears, however, that cyclists there may abandon them under the same circumstances set for the in California Code.

The state with perhaps the scariest mandatory use language is one generally considered the most bike friendly in North America, Oregon. Its vehicle code states that, “A person commits the offense of failure to use a bicycle lane or path if the person operates a bicycle on any portion of a roadway that is not a bicycle lane or bicycle path when a bicycle lane or bicycle path is adjacent to or near the roadway.”

An “offense.” Yikes. Still, even in Oregon a bike lane or path may be abandoned to pass other cyclists, to make a left turn, to avoid hazard and to execute a right turn. Also, Oregon provides that a person need not comply with the mandatory use law unless it has been determined after public hearing that the bike lane or path is “suitable for safe bicycle use at reasonable rates of speed.”

As is generally the case, knowing what the law requires depends on the particular circumstances and where you are. If you want to check the law on mandatory use in your state, The League of American Bicyclists has a very helpful chart online. Be advised, however, that laws can change at any time without notice.

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—Disclaimer—
Nothing contained in this column should be construed as legal advice. The information contained herein may or may not match your individual situation. Also, laws differ from place to place and tend to change over time. No reader should act or refrain from acting on the basis of any information presented herein without seeking the advice of an attorney in the relevant jurisdiction. This column is meant to promote awareness of a general legal issue. As such, it is meant as entertainment. It does not create an attorney-client relationship between the author and the reader.
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Categories: Fixed

Cycling Blog: On The Road to Health/Women's Beginner Ride Saturday April 26th - Jackson Clarion Ledger

Google News | Cycling - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 09:37

Cycling Blog: On The Road to Health/Women's Beginner Ride Saturday April 26th
Jackson Clarion Ledger
In October of 2011, Phil Reed, President/CEO of Voice of Calvary Ministries (VOCM), got an idea for a 63 mile bike ride to be held on April 21st of 2012 to commemorate his 63rd birthday, as well as raise funds for the some local non-profit organizations.

Categories: News

Pécsi tavasz

Hungarian Cycle Chic - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 08:53

Pécsre is megérkezett a tavasz. Napszemüveg, zakó, kosár és modern női bicaj - már mind a láthatáron innen vannak.

A fotót olvasónk, Koch Márton készítette. Küldj be Te is fotót, hogy kitehessük!

Ha tetszett a poszt, nyomj egy lájkot és kövesd a blogot a facebookon!

Megosztom Facebookon! Megosztom iWiWen! Megosztom Twitteren! Megosztom Google Buzzon! Megosztom Google Readeren! Megosztom Tumblren!

Categories: Style

Pro Bike Gallery: Fabian Cancellara’s Trek Domane for Paris-Roubaix

VeloNews - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 08:49

A special paint job for Fabian's Roubaix ride. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

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  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's Trek Domane Classics Edition

    Fabian Cancellara's bike for the 2014 edition of Paris-Roubaix was largely identical to the 2013 version. Trek's Domane Classics Edition frame pairs the company's ISOspeed decoupler, designed to improve comfort, with longer, lower geometry better suited to the position professional riders prefer. Cancellara rides on Bontrager's Aeolus 5 D3 carbon tubulars with FMB Paris-Roubaix 27mm tires. Shimano takes care of the drivetrain — Cancellara prefers the mechanical Dura-Ace 9000 group over Di2 — and the rest of the components come from Trek house brand Bontrager.

    There are some changes from last year. Cancellara ditched the big Berner rear derailleur pulleys for the classics, which are designed to decrease drivetrain friction. He also switched from Speedplay to Shimano Dura-Ace pedals. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's Trek Domane Classics Edition

    The defending champ wasn't able to repeat at Paris-Roubaix, but he was on the podium yet again. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's Trek Domane Classics Edition

    FMB's Paris-Roubaix tubulars are by far the most common tire at the "Hell of the North." The fat, supple casings have proven themselves over the stones. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's Trek Domane Classics Edition

    Cancellara ran an 11-25 Shimano Dura-Ace cassette. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's Trek Domane Classics Edition

    Sponsor obligations often go out the window at Roubaix. The Trek mechanics don't even bother to Sharpie over the FMB logos. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's Trek Domane Classics Edition

    A special paint job for Fabian's Roubaix ride. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's Trek Domane Classics Edition

    Almst every rider has a list of the cobbled sectors on his top tube or stem, though few are as professionally done as the sticker on Cancellara's Domane. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's Trek Domane Classics Edition

    Seven spears and some dice for good luck. Cancellara's bike for the Ronde van Vlaanderen (Tour of Flanders), which we profiled a few weeks ago, has all the same graphic details, and we thought it was the same frame. But our colleague James Huang at BikeRadar has since reported that the two bikes are in fact different — the Flanders bike is essentially a Domane with geometry from Trek's regular road race frame, the Madone, while the Roubaix bike has the same Domane Classics Edition geometry that consumers can purchase. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's Trek Domane Classics Edition

    More spears on the head badge. Cancellara wasn't struck by bad luck on Sunday; it was the stronger Omega Pharma-Quick Step team that was his problem. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's Trek Domane Classics Edition

    Cancellara's cockpit is set up the same for Roubaix as for any other race. No extra brake levers, no double wrapped tape, nothing. Interestingly, he rides with an SRM head unit but did not ride with the actual SRM power meter crankset. He is likely just used to the interface of the computer, and wanted it for speed/distance/time. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's Trek Domane Classics Edition

    Details matter — cable crimps should match housing color. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's Trek Domane Classics Edition

    Cancellara uses these old Trek bottle cages (the logo on them is from nearly ten years ago) with a bit of grip tape to make sure the bottles don't eject themselves over the stones. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's Trek Domane Classics Edition

    The custom paint on Cancellara's Domane is muted but detailed. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's Trek Domane Classics Edition

    Cancellara has always prefered compressionless Nokon housing, which comes in an array of colors. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's Trek Domane Classics Edition

    "Tony Montana," one of Cancellara's many nicknames. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's Trek Domane Classics Edition

    No more oversized Berner pulleys in Cancellara's rear derailleur. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's Trek Domane Classics Edition

    Another change for 2014: no more Speedplay, Cancellara is now on Shimano's Dura-Ace 9000 pedals. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's Trek Domane Classics Edition

    Cancellara couldn't repeat this year, but will surely be back aboard another Domane to try again in 2015. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

The post Pro Bike Gallery: Fabian Cancellara’s Trek Domane for Paris-Roubaix appeared first on VeloNews.com.

Categories: News

Terpstra’s Winning Roubaix Details

Bike Hugger - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 08:46

Terpstra on the finishing track

Terpstra winning on a Roubaix

The difference between Terpstra’s bike and the Roubaix SL4 I’ve been riding in the rain, since the Fall, is Force 22 instead of the Red 22 spec. When raced or ridden hard, the fenders are removed and the fast, Zipp Firecrests replace the 30s. Force is SRAM’s value group, with all the features of Red, at a more affordable price. When asked recently about it, I said, if I close my eyes and don’t look at the graphics it shifts just like Red.

B/W

My fendered Roubaix on a dreary day

Between the two, there’s about a $3K price difference. Terpstra’s race-winning Roubaix is around $9K and my parking-lot crit, rolling-a-fondo version is $6K.

Terpstra’s details:

  • Frame: Specialized S-Works Roubaix – 58cm*
  • Groupset: SRAM RED 22
  • Shifters: SRAM RED 22 DoubleTap with Reach adjust
  • Crankset: Specialized (175mm crank arm length) with SRAM RED 22 chainrings – 53×46*
  • Front derailleur: SRAM RED 22 Yaw with chain spotter
  • Rear derailleur: SRAM RED 22 – Short cage
  • Cassette: SRAM PG1170 11-26
  • Brakes: SRAM RED Aerolink
  • Chain: SRAM RED 22
  • Wheels: Zipp 303 Firecrest Tubular
  • Stem: Zipp Service Course SL - 120mm
  • Bar: Zipp Service Course SL-88 - 40cm (c-c)
  • Seat post: Zipp Service Course SL 27.2mm 0mm Setback

*I run a 110 stem, 52/36 rings, Contis tubulars or Hutch clinchers, and a Joule instead of the Garmin.

My Roubaix was also seen in our Tool Roll launch, including a gear story in Issue 11.

Terpstra Photo by Gruber uploaded to Flickr

Categories: Culture

Cancellara still chasing history in the monuments

VeloNews - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 08:31

Fabian Cancellara was unable to match Niki Terpstra's winning move at Paris-Roubaix and finished third. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

GHENT, Belgium (VN) — Fabian Cancellara said it himself — only the win matters — but he still closed his 2014 spring classics campaign with an impressive run. The Swiss “Spartacus” in black with white pinstripes won the Ronde van Vlaanderen (Tour of Flanders) and placed second in Milano-Sanremo and third in Paris-Roubaix.

“OK, it could be worse,” Cancellara said when the dust settled at the Roubaix velodrome Sunday. “I’ve been on the podium 12 times in a row in these monuments, and that’s also not so bad. I get measured on winning, not finishing second or third, but it’s OK like this.”

Taking out the 2012 De Ronde, when he abandoned with a broken collarbone, Cancellara (Trek Factory Racing) placed in the top three in every monument he raced. He has never lined up in the other two monuments, Liège-Bastogne-Liège and the Giro di Lombardia.

After the 2010 season, he said he would like to target all five monuments. “You lose your motivation doing the same things,” he said. “I need new challenges.”

The feat of winning all five monuments, however, remains in the hands of Roger De Vlaeminck, Rik Van Looy, and Eddy Merckx — all Belgians.

Had Cancellara won in Roubaix, he would have been the first rider to win the De Ronde/Roubaix double three times. He also would have taken his fourth victory and matched Roubaix’s record for the most wins, sitting alongside De Vlaeminck and his current rival Tom Boonen (Omega Pharma-Quick Step). Instead, the numbers worked against Cancellara.

His key lieutenant Stijn Devolder could not start due to a crash in De Ronde. Gregory Rast lost ground in the Arenberg Forest with a bike change, while Yaroslav Popovych and Hayden Roulston crashed. With Roulston, Cancellara went down as well and had to change bikes. He nearly lost all chances to make 12 podiums in a row.

“I spent a lot of energy getting back on after changing bikes. Roubaix is a race where you can never spend too much energy because you’ll be missing it in the end.”

Cancellara appeared more human than “Spartacus” in these classics. In De Ronde, he followed and waited for the sprint. He did the same in Roubaix instead of attacking solo with 48 kilometers remaining as he did in 2010.

Boonen attacked. Sep Vanmarcke (Belkin) tried. And Peter Sagan (Cannondale) went, too. Cancellara dodged bullets, marked attacks and survived. He formed a part of an 11-man group with 20km to race. The numbers were stacked against the Swiss in black: Omega Pharma had three men, and Giant-Shimano and Sky counted two each.

“I couldn’t go with Boonen, that was too far out at 65km considering the headwind and Omega Pharma had more men behind. I knew I would have to wait,” Cancellara said.

“To just attack and to be in the front and then get dropped is also not what I wanted. My solution was to go towards the velodrome and then do my best: Third place and second behind John Degenkolb in a sprint like this.”

Omega Pharma won the race. Niki Terpstra attacked the front group and quickly put some real estate between himself and the chasers. His teammates Boonen and Zdenek Stybar watched. Cancellara’s chance for a fourth win and a third double vanished.

Cancellara said he did not want to risk a podium spot with a desperate chase. “Honestly, I race for winning, not arriving for second or third,” he said. “But in the end, I’m realistic.”

The post Cancellara still chasing history in the monuments appeared first on VeloNews.com.

Categories: News
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