Between Hell & High Water

Salsa Amigos - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 05:00

Just east of the middle of nowhere, on the tri-state corner of Idaho, Nevada and Oregon, is a land so vastly remote that it’s populated by more antelope than people. From the lazy byway that roles across the sage, it could be mistaken as unremarkable or perhaps even boring. But to me, it represents potential; the potential to see as far as you can see, the potential to spin your wheels over sweeping landscapes, the potential to ride with history.

Look closer and you may catch glimpses of the potential that lies below: a black crease in the surface, a cut in the terrain. This is Idaho’s canyonlands country.

Snow fed, the 150-plus miles of rivers run every year for a short window in spring, flooding the canyons with upwards of 8,000cfs. The peak flow may plummet overnight, or taper over a month. But sooner than later, desert heat bakes hotter than hades forcing the creeks dry until the following spring. But during a sliver of time, between the rage and furnace, the desert blooms with opportunity for fun hogs.

Back to the maps, I divined a route mixing a reasonable drive, long backcountry ranch roads, and a remote corner of the upper Owyhee river. Get in, get out, in four days time.

We tested some new bike-friendly gear for Gear Junkie. In tow, I used and will be reporting on a Sea To Summit’s ultralight Spark Sp II 35-degree sleeping bag, Big Agnes Super Scout UL2 tent, Smith’s Chromapop lens, and Eddie Bauer’s guide-inspired Sorcerer pack. Plus, we dined on a gourmet freeze-dried menu supplied by Good To-Go foods. You can look for these stories on Gearjunkie.com

Last year the Oregon Coast wildly blew my expectations for wallowing in fun, but there was a lot of pushing. The desert offered more time in the saddle but with a splash of canyon rivers. Still, we left room for some suffering, because adventure starts with the potential for new experiences.

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ABOUT THE GUEST BLOGGER

Steve Graepel is an art director, medical illustrator, husband, father of two, and a thief—stealing any free time he finds to explore his backyard in the greater Pacific Northwest.

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Categories: Free

I’m Shopping for a Go-Pro and I Shouldn’t Have To

Portlandize - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 04:26

Yesterday was just another school day. Get up before the kids and start getting myself ready. I even had a little time to myself while I ate breakfast. Get the kids up and start getting them ready. Not too much whining and cajoling to get them to eat their breakfast while I pack a lunch for my daughter. Load the bike with stuff, put the kids in the bike, and off we go to drop her at school.

We live a block off of a Neighborhood Greenway . This should be a pleasant 0.8-mile ride to school. It has traffic calming devices like speed bumps and traffic diverters (the little circles, usually with a tree in the middle, that make direct left turns impossible and have double-yellow lines on either side of them). I’m sure that the majority of the people driving on them are our neighbors who, should we see each other at the grocery store or a block party, wouldn’t wish us ill. However, every day we get passed unsafely. Sometimes they pass too closely and are going too fast. When I say “too close” and “too fast” this is the kind of thing I mean: my bike weighs 90 pounds without the kids in it (and they are about 50 pounds each) and I’ve been shoved to the right by the wind of cars going past us. If you can move 190 pounds plus what I weigh (which is none of your business, but it’s more than the 110 I weighed in junior high school) with just the shock wave of the air around your car then you just passed us unsafely.

Most of the time the problem isn’t speed and proximity, it’s that people are passing us illegally. By this I mean in an intersection (ORS 811.305) or they are crossing a double-yellow line (ORS 811.420, which means it was also a violation of ORS 811.065 since I’m on a bicycle). We all learned that double-yellow lines indicate a No Passing Zone, right? The case yesterday morning was that a driver that was behind us on the Neighborhood Greenway decided that, despite a car on the left and one on the right, he didn’t need to stop at the 4-way stop but could proceed through on my turn to my left in the oncoming traffic’s lane. He passed us in the intersection instead of letting those other cars take their turns. I don’t come off the line very fast (see the above-mentioned weight and consider physics). He revved like crazy and passed close enough that I could touch his car. I didn’t, but I could have.

I wish that I could believe that having a description of the driver (white male, dark hair), a description of the car (tan Mercedes sedan, older squarish model approx 1977 vintage,

Random photo of a  1977 Mercedes Benz 230 E that I found on the internet.

Random photo of a 1977 Mercedes Benz 230 E that I found on the internet. It’s similar to the one that passed me .

no passengers, no car seats or boosters), and most of the license plate (877GD_ or GD_877) was enough to generate some kind of censure, but I doubt it. I’ve been encouraged to call the non-emergency police line, but too many others have told me that *if* an officer looks into it nothing actually comes of the situation. My priority at the time was to get us to the school safely so I didn’t stop and call 9-1-1 in the moment. I do think that this driver, even if this was “innocent” negligence and not malice, was a hazard to the other people that were in his way as he went to wherever he was going.

(And then there was the truck needed to pass us as we turned left onto an arterial. I was already signaling that I would be turning at the next right, but he could not stand to be behind us for 1/2 a block. That scare was what made me lose part of the Mercedes’ license plate number.)

I do think that if I had video evidence of what happened that I would be more willing to call and report the incident. So we are looking for a Go-Pro. A parent taking her kids to school — whether it be by car, bike, or foot — shouldn’t have to be recording video constantly because she’s endangered that often. Today was not an isolated incident. The last time I made an effort to count how many times we were passed illegally in the 1.6-mile round-trip to school it was 5; there were 2 more drivers that I witnessed passing other people on bikes illegally for a total of 7 that morning. It’s an epidemic.

We’ve already been pushed off the major arterials and onto the Neighborhood Greenways. Fine. It is a more pleasant ride, but makes it harder to get to the businesses on the arterials. I manage, but it’s annoying. Now we have aggressive drivers on the streets that are supposed to be giving other modes of travel priority over cars. I for one have had enough. I’m not going to be pushed over another block. I have a right to travel where I need to in safety, unmolested by others. I intend on annoying the people at PBOT Safety about every single aggressive driver. I plan on posting license plate numbers and descriptions of drivers and their illegal and unsafe behavior that I witness. And I plan on getting a camera to record what they are doing and posting that as well. My hope is that they are unaware of how dangerous they are and that when they see their behavior from my perspective they will slow down and pass us safely. Heck, they might even care that they are breaking laws. I’m more than happy to pull over in a safe place so that a driver can pass, and I do it every day. Thirty seconds of patience is not too much to ask.

Categories: Culture

girl + BIKE

Fixed Gear Girl Taiwan - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 04:00
Categories: Fixed

halleycat 3

Milano Fixed - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 03:46

#TNRHC from Timothy on Vimeo.

Categories: Fixed

New York Journalist Covers Cycling in Denmark and Scandinavia

Copenhagenize - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 03:32
This just in... hot off the presses. As always, Copenhagenize has its finger on the pulse of breaking news.

A roving New York reporter covers cycling in Scandinavia.

"If for nothing else the bicycle is blessed in Scandinavia because it saves time."

"No other country has done more for the pleasure and comfort of its wheelmen than Denmark..."

"The construction of pavements takes in consideration what best can serve the interests of cyclists, and cycle paths are provided near all cities, in some instances leading miles away from town into the country."

"...ride to market on their bicycles with baskets strapped to their backs, and other baskets dangling from the handle-bars of the wheel. ... they seldom come to grief, and manage to keep their equilibrium to their journey's end."

From the New York Sun. 19 February 1897. 42,979 days ago (based on today's date)
(The Sun was a New York newspaper that was published from 1833 until 1950. It was considered a serious paper, like the city's two more successful broadsheets The New York Times and the New York Herald Tribune. The Sun was the most politically conservative of the three.)

Copenhagenize the planet. And have a lovely day.
Categories: Culture

5 reasons Singapore is not a cycling nation yet - The Straits Times

Google News | Cycling - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 02:30

The Straits Times

5 reasons Singapore is not a cycling nation yet
The Straits Times
SINGAPORE - National Development Minister Khaw Boon Wan said on Wednesday that cycling should not be just a recreational pursuit, but also a viable transport option for short trips around Singapore. However, he noted that cycling makes up just 1 to 2 ...
Cycling can be viable transport mode: KhawAsiaOne

all 3 news articles »
Categories: News

Shake Down Ride Shakes Something Out: Part 2

Guitar Ted Productions - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 01:30
Stuck On You Part 2!Okay, a week ago I had a great Fall ride on the Fargo Gen 1 when at the end of it all I had something odd happen with my rear wheel. (See the post here) Well. yesterday I got around to sussing that issue out, and here's how it went down.

The Subject: A Hope Pro Evo II hub with a SRAM 9 speed cassette with the individually mounted cogs. Yes......they were stuck on! It wasn't critical to getting to the bottom of my problem, but you'd rather not have to deal with those teeth. At least I didn't. The Hope Pro evo II has removable/swappable end caps for quick release or through axles, so you simply pop off your end cap. Then this allows a tool free removal of the cassette free hub body, which reveals the free hub mechanism. You can see what that looks like on the left here.

Now I could remove a couple of the smaller cogs off the cassette and then bang on the backside of the cassette with a rubber mallet to push off the cassette and get that out of the way.

Cassette removed!The Diagnosis:  Once the cassette is removed I could handle the free hub body much easier and get to cleaning the old grease away so I could see if I either had a breakdown or just some stuck pawls. I employed some foaming degreaser of the citrus variety from Tri-Flow. I had to do this about three times to begin with. Whatever grease those U.K. blokes put in there is pretty tenacious!

As I worked more and more grease away from the mechanism, I noticed two things. One- The grease coming off was silvery. That's never a good sign! This means the grease is contaminated with metal. Hopefully just worn metal from years of coasting!

Two- The pawls were not "springing back to life", and this was cause for concern. Maybe something really did break. More applications of degreaser and the mystery was solved. I had a complete failure of all four pawl springs!

It's a dead parrot! No! Its pining for the fjords, or simply stunned! Bummer! Well, as I stated last week, better to find out about it before the Geezer Ride! Had I not done the 32 mile pre-ride shake down cruise, I would have had the failure on the ride, and that would have been disastrous. Or at the very least, it would have provided quite the story! 

The Solution: Well, now its on to the solution. I have a spare Hope Pro Evo II wheel sitting around that I could scavenge the free hub body off of, but I am not desperate to ride the Fargo just now. So, I won't be stealing that free hub body now. My second option, of course, is to just replace the whole shootin' match with a steel free hub body and that would also solve my issues with the cassette digging into the alloy bodied free hub. I'm thinking this sounds like the reasonable choice, given that I typically don't buy XT level cassettes for my gravel/rough stuff bikes. It really doesn't weigh all that much more either. I'd gladly trade off the minimal gain in grams for the ease of servicing the cassette/free hub.

So, I think a steel free hub body will soon be on its way, and this nearly seven year old hub will be back in service again on the good ol' Fargo Gen 1 rig. I won't necessarily be needing the old bike for a bit, so I'll be okay with waiting on that. Heck- it's getting to be fat biking season, and the single speed bikes are all ready to roll in the meantime. Fall is definitely single speed time around here anyway.
Categories: Free

INCOTEX FOR MR PORTER URBAN CYCLING COLLECTION

Fixed Gear Girl Taiwan - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 01:00
MR PORTER 幫愛騎車的都會型男精選了幾樣單品,秋天/冬天這樣穿好CLASSIC啊~~
When bicycles became a ubiquitous addition to city life during the 19th century, the fashions of the time worked accordingly. Suit makers and dress makers of the time took into account cycling as part of a casual routine of leisure. As automobiles came to dominate the streets and become the preferred mode of transportation along side city buses and subways, fashion pulled away from catering to the cyclist for quite some time.And while cycling for commuting has long been a mainstay in many European cities and Asia, North America has seen a major rise in riding for transportation over the last 10 years largely due to the recession and increasing fuels costs.Today it comes as no surprise that fashion is once again filling the needs of bicycle commuters looking for garments that function well on and off the bike. A variety of niche brands have popped up to take the lead in the urban cycling fashion space – OutlierGiroRaphaParker Dusseau come to mind – there is always room for more.Enter the new MR PORTER x Incotex Urban Cycling Collection: a range of Italian-made garments exclusive to the online retailer from the strong casual wear line. Incotex and MR PORTER offer a tight collection of goods that should work well for more. The clear standout from the collection is the reflective wool blazerand trouser combo perfect for the guy who needs to wear a suit. Incotex add a touch of stretch to the ensemble ensuring proper movement while on the bicycle. With luck, this is just the start of traditional fashion re-entering the cycling space.VIA
Categories: Fixed

Dealer Tour: Austin retailers seek niches in increasingly saturated market

Bicycle Retailer & Industry News - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 00:25
The Dealer Tour group rode through downtown and university neighborhoods on Day 2.

AUSTIN, Texas (BRAIN) — Take away the perpetually sunny skies, year-round mild temps and the ever-present Southern hospitality, and it might be easy to mistake Austin for Portland, Oregon.

Striking similarities between the two cities include: a booming population of under a million, hip food trucks and new restaurants emerging on nearly every corner, a vibrant cycling culture that spans all disciplines, a large green space accessible from town, numerous bridges that connect the downtown with other parts of the city, a growing cycling infrastructure, a vibe that makes you want to stay awhile — and above all, the two cities are siblings in weirdness, with Portland having adopted and adapted the "Keep Austin Weird" slogan for its own use.

And the parallels don't end there. Like Portland, Austin's bicycle retail market is saturated, with anywhere from 50 to 60 bike shops and counting within the city limits. But also like its unofficial Pacific Northwest sister city, what has been the saving grace of the Austin bike retail landscape appears to be differentiation in the form of the niche shop.

On day two of BRAIN Dealer Tour Austin, the group visited five distinctly different retailers in the city's downtown and university neighborhoods, from the full-service University Cyclery loyal to its primary brand, Giant, to Clown Dog Bikes, a service-oriented store working out of a 300-square-foot space located a stone's throw from the University of Texas campus.

"We've found our niche. We are the pricepoint shop," said Bryce Holt, co-owner of Clown Dog Bikes, which has a huge student customer base. "With so many shops here in Austin, you have to."

To cater to Austin's booming commuter and student population, Windmill Bicycles opened nearly two years ago and is the youngest shop on the tour so far. Sibling co-owners Aaron and Sarah Goeth saw an opportunity to serve one of a few underserved areas in East Austin and have subsequently watched other entrepreneurs move in as the gentrification wave hit the Cherrywood neighborhood. About 60 percent of Windmill's customers are women and they've carved out a niche as not only a female-friendly store, but also as an approachable shop for beginner riders.

On the other end of the spectrum, there is no shortage of multisport stores to serve Austin's sizable triathlon market. A climate that's conducive to year-round training attracts not only resident athletes to swim-bike-run, but is also a home run for events, which bring triathletes from all over the country and even the world to Austin. During big race weekends in the city, Austin Tri Cyclist does tens of thousands of dollars in sales to athletes from Mexican cities including Monterrey and Guadalajara.

But besides honing in on a niche and going whole hog with it, the Austin retailers we've visited so far prioritize good service. "For us, it's about reliability and falling within our customers' budget — and being nice to people," said Holt of Clown Dog Bikes. "But there was a time in Austin when there was an attitude of elitism in some of the stores. We don't come from bike shops. We have both worked service jobs so I guess we know how to treat people."

Many retailers in Austin seem to extend this same hospitality to each other, despite the fact that they're all fighting for slices of the same pie. From partnering to support good local causes to selling a nearby retailer parts when they're in need, most shops in Austin seem to view the others less as a crippling threat than as friendly competition they can even learn from.

"I see competition as a good thing," said Vytis Vardys, owner of Ozone Bike Department, a fixture in the Austin bike shop scene for 20 years. "It validates what you be doin', you know?"

  • Our group made its way across and down the Pfluger bridge, a pedestrian and bicycle crossing of Lady Bird Lake. The bridge connects downtown to Auditorium Shores and Butler Park. Our group made its way across and down the Pfluger bridge, a pedestrian and bicycle crossing of Lady Bird Lake. The bridge connects downtown to Auditorium Shores and Butler Park.
  • University Cyclery, a 10,000-square-foot shop on Lamar Boulevard, was one of the original Schwinn shops in Austin. It has been family owned since 1976 and at one point, the business consisted of three stores. This store eventually got bigger and the other two closed. Jim Cox bought it 12 years ago from his parents and now sells “a little bit of everything” though Giant makes up 80 percent of his bike sales, with Jamis, Yeti, Redline, Surly, Stolen and Fiction accounting for the remainder.  University Cyclery, a 10,000-square-foot shop on Lamar Boulevard, was one of the original Schwinn shops in Austin. It has been family owned since 1976 and at one point, the business consisted of three stores. This store eventually got bigger and the other two closed. Jim Cox bought it 12 years ago from his parents and now sells “a little bit of everything” though Giant makes up 80 percent of his bike sales, with Jamis, Yeti, Redline, Surly, Stolen and Fiction accounting for the remainder.
  • University Cyclery owner Jim Cox said his location is one of his biggest assets. Not only is it on one of the busiest roads, but his family owns the building so it can’t be taken over and turned into condos. “Being in the middle of town helps us compete,” he said, adding that Austin has become saturated with bike shops. “People say there are as many shops here in Austin as in Dallas and Houston combined.” University Cyclery owner Jim Cox said his location is one of his biggest assets. Not only is it on one of the busiest roads, but his family owns the building so it can’t be taken over and turned into condos. “Being in the middle of town helps us compete,” he said, adding that Austin has become saturated with bike shops. “People say there are as many shops here in Austin as in Dallas and Houston combined.”
  • The Dealer Tour crew captivated by one of Clown Dog’s comedic advertisements about their Mega Sale last May (you can find it on YouTube). The shop also had produced several how-to videos on wrapping handlebars with non-aero brake levers, changing flat tires and installing and removing pedals. The Dealer Tour crew captivated by one of Clown Dog’s comedic advertisements about their Mega Sale last May (you can find it on YouTube). The shop also had produced several how-to videos on wrapping handlebars with non-aero brake levers, changing flat tires and installing and removing pedals.
  • Bryce Holt and John Chisholm started Clown Dog Bikes in 2000. Neither of them had any previous bike shop experience or startup cash. With a $5,000 loan they began acquiring bikes from a pawn shop and selling them to friends. “We sold single speed bikes and BMX bikes for a long time and as we became engrained in Austin, we found our niche. We fill in the gap between Wal-Mart and bike shops, whose bikes start in the $500 range,” said Holt. Their 310-square-foot shop is well established now and has a healthy r Bryce Holt and John Chisholm started Clown Dog Bikes in 2000. Neither of them had any previous bike shop experience or startup cash. With a $5,000 loan they began acquiring bikes from a pawn shop and selling them to friends. “We sold single speed bikes and BMX bikes for a long time and as we became engrained in Austin, we found our niche. We fill in the gap between Wal-Mart and bike shops, whose bikes start in the $500 range,” said Holt. Their 310-square-foot shop is well established now and has a healthy repair and service business—fixing flats, truing wheels and doing quick tune-ups for the University of Texas student community.
  • Ozone Bike Dept. co-owner Vytis Vardys Jr. may be one of the most exuberant—and wickedly funny—retailers we’ve ever come across, as he recounted his shop’s colorful history for the Dealer Tour crew (stay tuned for the Dec. 1 print issue of Bicycle Retailer). Located on a section of Guadalupe Street known as “The Drag” near the University of Texas, Ozone got its start in 1992 as the antique bike annex of Ozone Vintage Clothing. The shop still does the occasional restoration, but the store’s staffers are all Ozone Bike Dept. co-owner Vytis Vardys Jr. may be one of the most exuberant—and wickedly funny—retailers we’ve ever come across, as he recounted his shop’s colorful history for the Dealer Tour crew (stay tuned for the Dec. 1 print issue of Bicycle Retailer). Located on a section of Guadalupe Street known as “The Drag” near the University of Texas, Ozone got its start in 1992 as the antique bike annex of Ozone Vintage Clothing. The shop still does the occasional restoration, but the store’s staffers are all mountain bikers, so Ozone stocks a plentiful supply of Kona off-road rigs alongside the city bikes, racks, bags, lights and locks that the Longhorn crowd and surrounding neighborhood demand. “If we don’t have this particular inventory, we don’t have customers,” Vardys said. This year, the university’s Daily Texan newspaper named Ozone its Best of UT Bike Shop.
  • With its location on a busy cycling route and close proximity to the university, service and drop-in repairs like flat tires account for about 45 percent of Ozone Bike Dept.’s business. With its location on a busy cycling route and close proximity to the university, service and drop-in repairs like flat tires account for about 45 percent of Ozone Bike Dept.’s business.
  • Siblings Sarah and Aaron Goeth opened one of Austin’s newer shops to cater to women and, specifically, new and up-and-coming commuters.Windmill Bicycles, a small but artfully laid out and merchandised 1,000-square-foot shop in East Austin’s Cherrywood neighborhood, will turn two in December. They carry small, unique brands including bikes from Papillionaire, Biria, Fairdale and Ynot and Fortuna Monsoon bags, along with more well-known brands like Fuji and Linus. Siblings Sarah and Aaron Goeth opened one of Austin’s newer shops to cater to women and, specifically, new and up-and-coming commuters.Windmill Bicycles, a small but artfully laid out and merchandised 1,000-square-foot shop in East Austin’s Cherrywood neighborhood, will turn two in December. They carry small, unique brands including bikes from Papillionaire, Biria, and Ynot and Fortuna Monsoon bags, along with more well-known brands like Fuji and Linus.
  • Windmill Bicycles’ merchandising, interior layout and fixtures were all carefully crafted and designed by its owners. Windmill Bicycles’ merchandising, layout and fixtures were all carefully crafted and designed by its owners.
  • Austin Tri Cyclist has served the city's multisport market since 1995. Don and Missy Ruthven bought the business in 2001, and have grown it ever since, from remodel work (done mostly by Don) that has doubled the shop's retail space and the opening of a second location in 2013 to a recent expansion of its running department. Austin Tri Cyclist carries a huge selection of wetsuits and swim accessories, as well as more than 150 road, tri and mountain bikes in stock in its flagship store on Barton Spr Austin Tri Cyclist has served the city's multisport market since 1995. Don and Missy Ruthven bought the business in 2001, and have grown it ever since, from remodel work (done mostly by Don) that has doubled the shop's retail space and the opening of a second location in 2013 to a recent expansion of its running department. Austin Tri Cyclist carries a huge selection of wetsuits and swim accessories, as well as more than 150 road, tri and mountain bikes in stock in its flagship store on Barton Springs Road in downtown Austin.
  •  Austin Tri Cyclist’s logo is an internationally recognized icon of the triathlon scene. Armadillo power: Austin Tri Cyclist’s logo is an internationally recognized icon of the triathlon scene.
  • We took a short photo break in front of the state capitol on our way to Austin Tri Cyclist. We took a short photo break in front of the state capitol on our way to Austin Tri Cyclist.
  • Our group made its way across and down the Pfluger bridge, a pedestrian and bicycle crossing of Lady Bird Lake. The bridge connects downtown to Auditorium Shores and Butler Park.
  • University Cyclery, a 10,000-square-foot shop on Lamar Boulevard, was one of the original Schwinn shops in Austin. It has been family owned since 1976 and at one point, the business consisted of three stores. This store eventually got bigger and the other two closed. Jim Cox bought it 12 years ago from his parents and now sells “a little bit of everything” though Giant makes up 80 percent of his bike sales, with Jamis, Yeti, Redline, Surly, Stolen and Fiction accounting for the remainder.
  • University Cyclery owner Jim Cox said his location is one of his biggest assets. Not only is it on one of the busiest roads, but his family owns the building so it can’t be taken over and turned into condos. “Being in the middle of town helps us compete,” he said, adding that Austin has become saturated with bike shops. “People say there are as many shops here in Austin as in Dallas and Houston combined.”
  • The Dealer Tour crew captivated by one of Clown Dog’s comedic advertisements about their Mega Sale last May (you can find it on YouTube). The shop also had produced several how-to videos on wrapping handlebars with non-aero brake levers, changing flat tires and installing and removing pedals.
  • Bryce Holt and John Chisholm started Clown Dog Bikes in 2000. Neither of them had any previous bike shop experience or startup cash. With a $5,000 loan they began acquiring bikes from a pawn shop and selling them to friends. “We sold single speed bikes and BMX bikes for a long time and as we became engrained in Austin, we found our niche. We fill in the gap between Wal-Mart and bike shops, whose bikes start in the $500 range,” said Holt. Their 310-square-foot shop is well established now and has a healthy r
  • Ozone Bike Dept. co-owner Vytis Vardys Jr. may be one of the most exuberant—and wickedly funny—retailers we’ve ever come across, as he recounted his shop’s colorful history for the Dealer Tour crew (stay tuned for the Dec. 1 print issue of Bicycle Retailer). Located on a section of Guadalupe Street known as “The Drag” near the University of Texas, Ozone got its start in 1992 as the antique bike annex of Ozone Vintage Clothing. The shop still does the occasional restoration, but the store’s staffers are all
  • With its location on a busy cycling route and close proximity to the university, service and drop-in repairs like flat tires account for about 45 percent of Ozone Bike Dept.’s business.
  • Siblings Sarah and Aaron Goeth opened one of Austin’s newer shops to cater to women and, specifically, new and up-and-coming commuters.Windmill Bicycles, a small but artfully laid out and merchandised 1,000-square-foot shop in East Austin’s Cherrywood neighborhood, will turn two in December. They carry small, unique brands including bikes from Papillionaire, Biria, Fairdale and Ynot and Fortuna Monsoon bags, along with more well-known brands like Fuji and Linus.
  • Windmill Bicycles’ merchandising, interior layout and fixtures were all carefully crafted and designed by its owners.
  • Austin Tri Cyclist has served the city's multisport market since 1995. Don and Missy Ruthven bought the business in 2001, and have grown it ever since, from remodel work (done mostly by Don) that has doubled the shop's retail space and the opening of a second location in 2013 to a recent expansion of its running department. Austin Tri Cyclist carries a huge selection of wetsuits and swim accessories, as well as more than 150 road, tri and mountain bikes in stock in its flagship store on Barton Spr
  •  Austin Tri Cyclist’s logo is an internationally recognized icon of the triathlon scene.
  • We took a short photo break in front of the state capitol on our way to Austin Tri Cyclist.
AUSTIN DEALER TOUR - OZONE BIKE DEPARTMENT
Categories: News

quick draw

Milano Fixed - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 00:10
Categories: Fixed

Levi’s Stadium pilots trail entry for Cal – Oregon game Friday

Cyclelicious - Wed, 10/22/2014 - 23:33


Oregon Ducks vs Cal Bears

After meeting with community representatives and Silicon Valley Bicycle Coalition board member Scott Lane, the city of Santa Clara and Levi’s Stadium management agreed to a limited trial to open the San Tomas Aquino Trail between Agnew Road and the south side of the Great America lot near Gate C.

For events with over 20,000 participants at Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, policy has been to close the popular San Tomas Aquino Trail between Agnew Road and Tasman Drive, as shown in red in the below map. People who walk or bike along the trail must take the detour shown in green, adding 1400 yards through busy parking lot traffic to those who travel between Tasman and Agnew.


San Tomas Aquino Trail closed by Levi's Stadium

Santa Clara police chief Mike Sellers met with Scott Lane of the Silicon Valley Bicycle Coalition, mayoral candidate Deborah Bress, Santa Clara BPAC member Craig Larsen, bike activist Andrew Boone, and myself to discuss the impact of the closure on trail users. Sellers and stadium management agreed to a partial opening of the trail in this pilot.

“Working with cool heads, we’ve been working step by step together with the SCPD, Santa Clara through the Bike Advisory Committee, and the Forty Niners Stadium Management Company in a whirlwind fashion that has required a lot of commitment from all parties,” said SVBC board member Scott Lane.

For Friday’s game, only cyclists with tickets to the California vs Oregon game can travel on the trail north of Agnew to a new valet bike parking location near Gate C at the south side of the Great America parking lot.

The trail will be closed to all traffic between 9 AM and 3 PM on Friday, October 24, 2014 for a security sweep, and will open only to cyclists with game tickets after 3 PM. Those with “will call” tickets, all pedestrians (including those with game tickets), and all other trail users without tickets in hand will be required to continue using the trail detour. The existing bike valet along Tasman Drive approaching Gate A will continue to be staffed.

This is a big first step and we appreciate the work of Chief Sellers, his assistant Chief Phil Cooke, 49ers VP of Operations Jim Mercurio, and Silicon Valley Bicycle Coalition bike valet volunteers for making this happen with just three days of work. Even with this pilot, however, the all day closure on a weekday will impact a significant number of trail users. We will continue to lobby to keep the trail open during all events.

One of the problems with the detour has been the heavy tour bus traffic. Santa Clara PD and stadium management are now aware of the issue and say they will work to clear the bus congestion in the parking lots and on Stars and Stripes Drive. They will also watch for illegal bus parking in those areas along the bike and pedestrian detour.

This is an interesting day for a pilot. The game will likely be lightly attended because (1) Levi’s Stadium is 50 miles from the University of California, Berkeley, and (2) kickoff happens during Game 3 of the World Series between the San Francisco Giants and the Kansas City Royals at AT&T Park.

VTA will also make adjustments for this Friday night game. The crowds will arrive during the evening commute. VTA will continue to provide regular commute service during this peak travel time as well as direct service trains to the stadium. For commuters, this means your trip home will remain the same. For stadium-goers, this means there will be direct light rail trains to the stadium from the Alum Rock and Santa Teresa lines before the game. For everyone, this means planning ahead and leaving extra time. For full details, read the VTA headways blog.

Finally, SVBC still needs several volunteers for the Friday night game. Please sign up to help make this happen!

Berkeley and Eugene are both known for their high population of bike hippies. How many of their alums will bike to a Friday night game?

Important notes about San Tomas Aquino Trail pilot opening

  • Trail will be closed to all traffic 9 AM to 3 PM, Friday, October 24, 2014.
  • San Tomas Aquino Trail will open only to those on bike with tickets in hand to the Cal – Oregon game. Security personnel will know to wave cyclists through on the trail at Agnew.
  • To discourage people from parking in neighborhoods south of the stadium, pedestrians will still be required to take the detour to access stadium entries at the north side of the stadium.
  • Bicyclists with tickets will park their bikes at the valet bike parking near the electric vehicle charging stations, proceed through the security check and magnetometers, and will be held to the same criteria (e.g. bag policy) as the balance of the stadium attendees.
  • The trail will reopen to all users shortly after the game.
  • THIS IS A PILOT PROGRAM SO PLEASE DON’T BE A JERK FACE TO THE SECURITY PERSONNEL MANNING THE CHECKPOINT AT AGNEW. They’re just doing their jobs.

    See also:

    1. Bicycle directions to Levi’s Stadium
    2. Levi’s stadium community meeting
    3. Where’s the stadium bike parking, Santa Clara?

    YARPP
Categories: Culture

Upright Cyclist New 12.5 oz Riding Denim

Urban Velo - Wed, 10/22/2014 - 23:33

Photo by Jeremy J MatthewsThe Upright Cyclist 12.5 oz Riding Denim pants are sewn in Los Angeles from American-made Cone denim. The cuffs have an internal reflective panel for visibility when rolled.

Available in 32, 33, 34 and 36 waist sizes, all come pre-hemmed in a standard 34” inseam length. Retail is $119. Check out www.uprightcyclist.com

Photo by Jeremy J Matthews, jeremyjmatthews.virb.com

Categories: Fixed

35MM | FIXED GEAR OPEN 6

Wheel Talk Fixed - Wed, 10/22/2014 - 22:29

35mm - China - Fixed Gear Open 6 - Judges - Loop Magazine

35mm - China - Fixed Gear Open 6 - Dew Sippawit - BW

35mm - China - Fixed Gear Open 6 - Ines Brunn

35mm - China - Fixed Gear Open 6 - Dew Sippawit - Tuck No Hander - BW

35mm - China - Fixed Gear Open 6 - Ines Brunn - Freestyle Competition

35mm - China - Fixed Gear Open 6 - Jaoa Danaikrit - Table Top - BW

Here’s some 35mm photos from the Fixed Gear Open 6 competition that was held in (Beijing) China earlier this year. I can’t even begin to describe or explain what a fucking good time this trip was. Having Dew Sippawit & Jaoa Danaikrit there for every step of the adventure was a crucial part of the trip and made going about life in this foreign land even easier. If you’ve never been on a trip w/ the homies, I highly advise you plan one; it’s quite possibly the only way to travel. Ines Brunn was there to compete and show people a side of fixed gear that most have forgotten and little attempt. The Thai boys came through and destroyed the cheese wedge I managed to catch shots of Jaoa’s tabletop and Dew’s tuck no hander to barspin. Check out more 35mm photos HERE.

Categories: Fixed

Art of the day

Fixed Gear Girl Taiwan - Wed, 10/22/2014 - 22:00
Categories: Fixed

ED WONKA | OAKLAND PEGS

Wheel Talk Fixed - Wed, 10/22/2014 - 19:05

Ed Wonka Laforte - Turf Bikes - Oakland - Pegs 1

I was looking through some older photos on my computer and came across these two shots that Seitaro Iki took of Ed “Wonka” Laforte riding a double peg down a rail in down town Oakland. These were taken back when we were still filming for Word Is Bond and were shot on the same day that Ed did the huge hanger at the end of his section. Check out an alternate angle below or browse through more of Seitaro Iki’s Photography HERE.


Ed Wonka Laforte - Turf Bikes - Oakland - Pegs2

Categories: Fixed

Anyone can ride with new cycling innovation - KCCI Des Moines

Google News | Cycling - Wed, 10/22/2014 - 18:45

Anyone can ride with new cycling innovation
KCCI Des Moines
A woman in a wheelchair, cycling down the street? ...it's something you don't see everyday, but Mark Tauscheck saw it today in Jefferson. At all Ability cycles in Jeffersonthey pride themselves in 3:02-"inclusive cycling.." ...getting everyone on a ...

Categories: News

Cycling in the city as the 'share economy' - Sydney Morning Herald

Google News | Cycling - Wed, 10/22/2014 - 18:39

Sydney Morning Herald

Cycling in the city as the 'share economy'
Sydney Morning Herald
It's Friday, rush hour, and Crown Street is all snafued with footpath construction. We are crossing with the lights, the poodle and I, filing between barricades when a bearded cyclist whizzes through, narrowly missing an old bloke who, having crept ...
Innovative app reveals gender divide in cyclistsEastLondonLines

all 8 news articles »
Categories: News

Dave Beard: Slackin’ V.8.

Lockedcog - Wed, 10/22/2014 - 18:24

Dave delivers again with some rad flicks better than your average bear. Good to see some Jakob Santos shots with him being real busy with his recently opened SKYLMT skate shop out in Oaklandia. Loving that waver rider of Gus looking too wild…click over for a bit more freestyle goodness.

 

 

Categories: Fixed

Pro GRT calendar announced for 2015

USA Cycling News - Wed, 10/22/2014 - 18:22
The 2015 Pro GRT will feature five events as it enters its seventh year of downhill racing.
Categories: News

Wildebeest migration captured in stunning timelapse video

GrindTV - Wed, 10/22/2014 - 18:20
Wildebeest migration

File photo of the Great Wildebeest Migration by Thomson Safaris/Flickr

The Great Wildebeest Migration is an awesome show of nature that occurs annually when 1.5 million wildebeests migrate between Serengeti in Tanzania and the Maasai Mara National Reserve in Kenya to find greener pastures.

It is the world’s largest migration of land animals that also involves 500,000 Thomson’s gazelles and 200,000 zebras, among other animals.

The 1,800-mile, round-trip migration includes crossing the Mara River where crocodiles feast on wildebeests that find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Wildlife photographers have taken countless photos and video footage of the famous crossing where 10,000 wildebeest can cross the river in a half hour. But Will and Matt Burrard-Lucas of the U.K. managed to capture the dynamics of the crossing in a way that has never been done before.

They spent five days patrolling the river to find out where the wildebeests were massing and then set up a camera at likely river crossings. The finished product is a timelapse video that is simply stunning.

The video is a finalist in the timelapse category of the 2014 Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition, and here you can see why:

“The scenes shown in this footage are among the most awe-inspiring I have ever witnessed!” Will wrote on the Burrard-Lucas Wildlife Photographer website. “We found that timelapse was the only medium that allowed us to convey the magnitude of the migration.

“This footage was shot over five days in Northern Serengeti, Tanzania. It shows the migrating wildebeest crossing the Mara River while moving south into Tanzania from Kenya.”

The animal you see in the middle of the river away from the massive wildebeest migration is a hippo. Spotting crocodiles, Will said, is more difficult.

At some points in the video, the wildebeests look like a large trail of ants. If only the wildebeests could move that fast in real life, they’d have a much better chance at escaping the jaws of crocodiles.

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The post Wildebeest migration captured in stunning timelapse video appeared first on GrindTV.com.

Categories: Culture
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